Aerospace & Defense

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Co. Exec Denies Signing Noncompete Deal

    The former director of government sales for a pharmaceutical company asked the North Carolina Business Court on Friday to knock out a breach of contract claim in a lawsuit that alleges he took trade secrets to a competitor, arguing the company has no valid noncompete agreement to back it up.

  • April 01, 2024

    Indicted Crypto Whiz Says Software Development Not A Crime

    The founder of the Tornado Cash cryptocurrency exchange told a Manhattan federal judge that the government had wrongly charged him with scheming to launder money and dodge sanctions, saying that the only agreement he'd made with others was to build legal, open-source software.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Judge Says Saudi Arabia Immune From Navy Attack Suit

    A Florida federal judge freed Saudi Arabia from a lawsuit alleging its responsibility for a Royal Saudi Air Force lieutenant's deadly shooting attack at a Pensacola Navy base, saying attack victims failed to overcome the country's immunity from U.S. lawsuits.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Wary Of Defense Co.'s Late $19.4M Pension Claim

    The Federal Circuit appeared skeptical Monday of an aviation defense company's attempt to revive pension claims against the federal government, as judges on the panel questioned the implications of reviving a claim outside the six-year statute of limitations.

  • April 01, 2024

    GE Vernova Spinoff Approved, Valued At $35.7B

    General Electric Co. said its board has approved the previously announced spinoff of its electric power business GE Vernova, setting the new company up to begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange on April 2.

  • March 29, 2024

    Argentine Gunmaker Accused of Hiding Light Trigger Defect

    An Argentine gun manufacturer was hit with a lawsuit by a Georgia man who says that a dangerous defect in the design of a 9 mm pistol got him shot when the gun accidentally discharged.

  • March 29, 2024

    High Bar To Meet For Novel Protest Over $45B DOE Deal

    The U.S. Department of Energy's deviation from typical federal acquisition rules to award a $45 billion contract to a company previously deemed ineligible is raising eyebrows among government contracting attorneys, but may nonetheless find support in court.

  • March 29, 2024

    Navy Overspent $399M In Ukraine Funding In 2022, DOD Says

    The U.S. Department of Defense said that lax financial controls in the U.S. Navy's budgeting system led it to overspend nearly $400 million in funds intended to help Ukraine following Russia's 2022 invasion, which has also increased the risk of triggering a possible Antideficiency Act violation in the future.

  • March 29, 2024

    RTX Cut From Deal Due To Worker's 'Likely' NDA Violation

    RTX Corp. can't be part of an anti-missile technology program following its hiring of a former naval analyst who may have violated a non-disclosure agreement while still employed with the Navy, a U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision unsealed Friday shows.

  • March 29, 2024

    L3Harris Accuses Moog Of Delays In Subdeals Worth $77.9M

    L3Harris Technologies Inc. has hauled fellow defense contractor Moog Inc. into Florida federal court, alleging that Moog failed to timely deliver critical satellite parts under several subcontracts worth $77.9 million, despite the U.S. government requiring expedited delivery for national defense purposes.

  • March 29, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Super Hornets And Chips

    This March, the Pentagon ordered a final batch of the "Top Gun: Maverick"-featured Super Hornet fighter plane from The Boeing Co., tapped IBM to create a trusted semiconductor enclave and devoted $1 billion to cracking down on nuclear smuggling abroad. These are some of the most noteworthy government contracts over the last month.

  • March 28, 2024

    White House Directs Agencies To Install AI Risk Safeguards

    The White House on Thursday issued a new directive requiring all federal agencies to address safety and civil rights risks in their use and procurement of artificial intelligence in an array of settings, including conducting screenings at airports and making decisions affecting Americans' healthcare, employment and housing.

  • March 28, 2024

    Sen. Menendez Won't Delay May 6 Trial As He Forgoes Appeal

    Sen. Robert Menendez told a New York federal judge Thursday he won't seek interlocutory appeal of his order two weeks ago rejecting the lawmaker's bid to dismiss his bribery case based on the speech and debate clause of U.S. Constitution, teeing up his jury trial set for May 6.

  • March 28, 2024

    University May Have Pried Too Deeply About Vet's Service Dog

    A Colorado state appeals court on Thursday rejected a university's argument that it could ask for additional documentation and details regarding a veteran's disability and his dog's training when it had "legitimate suspicions" about his dog not being a service animal, with the panel finding that argument outdated and inconsistent with Americans with Disabilities Act nondiscrimination regulations.

  • March 28, 2024

    Faruqi & Faruqi Beats 5 Firms To Lead NewAge Investor Suit

    A Colorado district judge has selected two clients of Faruqi & Faruqi LLP to lead an investor class action accusing the executives and directors of wellness company NewAge Inc. of securities fraud, saying the plaintiff with an even bigger financial interest is unfit for appointment because he hid his "troubling" background.

  • March 28, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes License For NM Nuke Storage Site

    The Fifth Circuit wiped out the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's license for a temporary nuclear waste storage facility in New Mexico, citing its August 2023 ruling finding the agency lacks authority to license a separate facility in Texas.

  • March 28, 2024

    Commerce Adds Export Admin Roles To Boost Nat'l Security

    The U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security is adding two new deputy assistant secretaries for export administration as part of a modernization drive to meet its growing national security role, the assistant secretary announced Thursday.

  • March 28, 2024

    NYC Firm Hit With $2.3M Suit Over Botched 9/11 Claim

    The family of a former Cantor Fitzgerald partner killed in the 9/11 attacks sued a personal injury boutique firm in New York state court over claims it botched their chance at recovering more than $2 million from a federal compensation fund.

  • March 28, 2024

    Grading Garland: Attys Give AG Mixed Reviews 3 Years In

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland's name won't be on the ticket in November, but his performance three years into his tenure is a subplot in the 2024 presidential election.

  • March 27, 2024

    Evidence On Ex-Mozambique Official Stays In $2B Fraud Suit

    A former Mozambique finance minister can't keep evidence from his phone out of a case alleging his involvement in a $2 billion scheme to siphon government-backed project funds from that country after a federal judge in Brooklyn on Wednesday backed the phone's seizure and search.

  • March 27, 2024

    Veterans Court Must Revisit Claim After Rejecting Evidence

    A veterans court must reconsider a request to backdate benefits for a veteran who survived a deadly plane crash while serving, after improperly rejecting evidence offered decades later potentially linking the experience to his PTSD, the Federal Circuit said Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    COVID Prompted Equity Plan Edit, Raytheon Tells Chancery

    Raytheon Technologies Corp. amended employee compensation plans in early 2020 to mitigate "head-spinning unprecedented volatility" from the COVID-19 pandemic, and a shareholder's allegations that directors acted in bad faith by failing to seek stockholder approval should be dismissed, the aerospace company told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Ex-GC With Lockheed Martin Space Joins Sherman & Howard

    A former general counsel and longtime attorney at Lockheed Martin has joined Sherman & Howard LLC as co-leader of the aerospace industry group, the law firm said Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Misconduct In 'Fat Leonard' Case Sinks 3 More Guilty Pleas

    Alleged prosecutorial misconduct has set up three more defendants charged in relation to the U.S. Navy's "Fat Leonard" scandal to yank their original guilty pleas so they can plead guilty to much less serious charges.

  • March 27, 2024

    Feds Want Suit Over Spillway's Dolphin Harm Tossed

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is asking a Mississippi federal judge to throw out a lawsuit claiming it harmed bottlenose dolphins by keeping a massive flood control spillway above New Orleans open for months and sending some 10.5 trillion gallons of polluted freshwater into the Mississippi Sound.

Expert Analysis

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

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    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Breathes New Life Into Article III Traceability

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Hardwick v. 3M Co. to vacate a district court's certification of one of the largest class actions in American jurisprudence for lack of Article III standing has potentially broader implications for class action practice in the product liability sphere, particularly in medical monitoring cases involving far-fetched theories of causation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Exporters Should Approach Self-Disclosure With Caution

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    A January Bureau of Industry and Security memorandum created an abbreviated process for disclosing export control violations that lack aggravating factors, but deciding which disclosure method to utilize remains a complex strategic undertaking to which companies must give careful consideration, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Recent Laws Affect Foreign Purchase Of US Real Estate

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    Early diligence is imperative for U.S. real estate transactions involving foreign actors, including analysis of federal and state foreign investment laws implicated by the transaction, depending on the property's nature and location, the parties' citizenship, and the transaction's structure, say Massimo D’Angelo and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    The PLUS Act Is The Best Choice For Veterans

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    Of two currently pending federal legislative proposals, the Preserving Lawful Utilization of Services Act's plan to diversify and expedite the processing of veterans' claims through an expanded network of accredited providers offers the better solution, say Michael Andrews at McGuireWoods and Matthew Feehan at Nearside Solutions.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • ASBCA Ruling May Pave Way For Pandemic-Related Claims

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    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals’ recent decision that the government failed to meet its evidentiary burden when it sought dismissal under the sovereign acts doctrine offers hope to contractors and subcontractors that faced performance challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, say Edward Arnold and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth.

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