Commercial Litigation UK

  • April 12, 2024

    CJEU Grand Chamber To Hear Patent Jurisdiction Referral

    The EU's highest court is set to hear arguments on whether a member state has authority to hear patent invalidity defenses for foreign patents, in a rare instance of a patent referral made to the court's 15-judge grand chamber.

  • April 12, 2024

    US-based MSD Broke Ban On Using 'Merck' In UK, Court Finds

    U.S.-based Merck Sharp & Dohme LLC's use of the "Merck" name on websites and social media breached the terms of a court order barring it from using the name in the U.K. to protect German drugmaker Merck KGaA's rights, a London court ruled Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 12, 2024

    John Lewis Beats Muslim Worker's Discrimination Claim

    Department store John Lewis has beaten accusations that it discriminated against a Muslim employee, but it botched the process for sacking him, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 12, 2024

    Abbott Loses Bid To Nix UK Whistleblowing Case On Appeal

    An appeals tribunal has rejected Abbott Laboratories' bid to escape a whistleblowing case brought by the founders of a British DNA technology business that it bought, concluding on Friday that the founders had an arguable case that U.K. judges had jurisdiction.

  • April 12, 2024

    Temp Engineer Must Pay £27K For 'Vexatious' Behavior

    An employment tribunal has ordered a temp to pay thousands of pounds in litigation costs for bringing a claim he knew he would lose, having previously failed to show on three other occasions that he was an employee or a worker.

  • April 12, 2024

    Denmark's £1.4B Tax Fraud Trial Heads For 'Uncharted Waters'

    Denmark will open its £1.4 billion ($1.7 billion) dividend fraud case in London on Monday, beginning a yearlong trial that will have wide implications for other disputes arising out of the cum-ex trading scandal that has swept Europe.

  • April 12, 2024

    Sky Managers Can't Appeal Dismissal Case On New Grounds

    Two former Sky store managers cannot reargue their claim that the company owes them money following a mandatory change of role, an appeals tribunal has ruled, blocking them from raising a challenge on grounds that did not come up in the original case.

  • April 12, 2024

    Apple Loses Bid To Toss $1B App Maker Charges Case

    The Competition Appeal Tribunal refused on Friday to toss a £785 million ($996 million) proposed class action by app developers against Apple over commission payments after finding that the claimants had a real shot at showing that the case was governed by U.K. law.

  • April 12, 2024

    Bayer Loses UK Protections For Billion-Dollar Blood Thinner

    A London court on Friday invalidated Bayer AG's patent for its best-selling blood thinner Xarelto, agreeing with an array of generic drugmakers that the German pharmaceutical giant had given away too much information in conference materials about the drug before seeking protections.

  • April 12, 2024

    Clyde & Co. Must Face Ex-Client's Pared-Back Negligence Suit

    Clyde & Co. LLP must face part of a construction magnate's negligence claim over a failed legal case concerning a soured investment, after a London judge tossed part of the case on Friday but ruled that one aspect of it had a real prospect of success.

  • April 11, 2024

    Autonomy Became Less Transparent Before Sale, Jury Told

    An ex-market analyst testifying Thursday in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch duped HP into buying the British company for $11.7 billion told jurors that the company became less forthcoming about some of its accounting a couple of years before the sale.

  • April 11, 2024

    BlackRock Can't Deduct Interest On $4B, London Court Finds

    Financial services firm BlackRock cannot deduct interest on $4 billion in loans it used for the 2009 purchase of Barclays Global Investors because avoiding taxes was the main reason for the way it structured the transaction, a London appeals court ruled Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Sidley Partner Says CPS Did Not Disclose Prosecution Info

    A former Sidley Austin LLP partner, a former senior KPMG LLP official and a banking adviser have hit back at the Crown Prosecution Service in the men's £66 million ($82.8 million) claim over a failed tax fraud prosecution, arguing that their prosecutor hid important information from them.

  • April 11, 2024

    Law Firm Denies Thwarting Driver's Injury Claim

    JMW Solicitors has pushed back at accusations by an injured delivery driver that it filed his compensation claim against the wrong defendant to avoid a conflict of interest with a valuable client.

  • April 11, 2024

    Plus-Size Clothing Retailer Sues Over Alleged Knockoffs

    A British fashion retailer has accused a London-based garment supplier of selling knockoffs of its "Yours" and "Yours Curve" plus-size women's clothing brands with a "Yours Curvy" line of products.

  • April 11, 2024

    Airbnb Owner Was Housekeeper's Employer, Tribunal Rules

    A housekeeper who worked at a Scottish castle was an employee instead of a worker and can proceed to sue her old boss for unfairly dismissing her, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Denies 'Cover Up' Of IT Bugs

    A former Post Office boss has denied trying to "cover up" the fact that senior members of the organization knew the IT system used to prosecute hundreds of innocent sub-postmasters was faulty, as he gave evidence to an inquiry Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Cable Co. Says Funding For Price Fixing CPO Lacks 'Visibility'

    A major European power cable supplier questioned Thursday whether a representative seeking damages on behalf of U.K. electricity customers had allocated enough money to cover their costs during a hearing to decide whether the mass claim should be certified.

  • April 11, 2024

    NHS Assistant With Lung Condition Wins COVID Bias Claim

    An NHS trust in England forced a hospital worker with a chronic lung condition to quit her job by refusing to let her work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 11, 2024

    ECHR Climate Ruling Provides Blueprint For Future Litigation

    A ruling from Europe's top human rights court that countries have obligations to protect their citizens from climate change could serve as a blueprint for other litigation brought by activists seeking to force action from governments and corporations over a warming planet.

  • April 11, 2024

    Failure To Address Group Chat Jokes Pushed Worker To Quit

    Blackpool Council forced an employee to resign after it failed to formally investigate her complaints about a "deluge" of inappropriate WhatsApp group messages that made her view the workplace as hostile, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 11, 2024

    Dough-Maker Loses Fight Against Order To Reverse Merger

    Dough maker Cérélia on Thursday lost its fight to avoid being forced to sell its Jus-Rol brand, with a London appeals court upholding a decision that the sale is necessary to protect retailers and shoppers from paying higher prices.

  • April 11, 2024

    Hendrix Bandmates Have No Claim To Copyright, Sony Says

    The U.K. arm of Sony has hit back at the estates of the former bandmates of Jimi Hendrix in their ongoing copyright feud over the group's back catalog, alleging that the pair consented to producers taking control.

  • April 11, 2024

    Solicitor Struck Off For Misleading Client Over PI Claim

    A former Slater and Gordon personal injury lawyer who admitted that he misled a client about the status of her claim for more than 15 years was struck off by a tribunal on Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Clarifying Legal Elements To Support A Genocide Claim At ICJ

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    Reporting on South Africa’s dispute against Israel in the International Court of Justice largely fails to clearly articulate what a case for genocide alleged in the context of war requires — a technical analysis that will evaluate several key factors, from the scale of the devastation to statements by officials, say Solomon Shinerock and Alex Bedrosyan at Lewis Baach.

  • Opinion

    Employment Tribunal Fees Risk Reducing Access To Justice

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    Before the proposed fee regime for employment tribunal claims can take effect, the government needs much more evidence that low-income individuals — arguably the tribunal system's most important users — will not be negatively affected by the fees, says Max Winthrop, employment law committee chair at the Law Society.

  • Tribunal Cases Illustrate Balancing Act Of Anti-Bias Protection

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    Recent employment tribunal discrimination cases show employers the complexities of determining the scope of protected characteristics under the Equality Act, and responding proportionately, particularly when conflicts involve controversial beliefs that can trigger competing employee discrimination claims, say Michael Powner and Sophie Rothwell at Charles Russell.

  • EU Ruling Exposes Sovereignty Fissures In Int'l Arbitration

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    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling that the U.K. had breached EU law by allowing an arbitral award to proceed underscores the diminished influence of EU jurisprudence in the U.K., hinting at the EU courts' increasingly nominal sway in international arbitration within jurisdictions that prize legal autonomy, says Josep Galvez at 4-5 Gray’s Inn.

  • UK Arbitration Ruling Offers Tips On Quelling Bias Concerns

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    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W to remove an arbitrator because of impartiality concerns offers several lessons on mitigating bias, including striking a balance between arbitration experience and knowledge of a particular industry, and highlights the importance of careful arbitrator appointment, says Paul-Raphael Shehadeh at Duane Morris.

  • UK Amazon Ruling Spotlights TM Rights In International Sales

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    Highlighting the conflict between the territorial nature of trademark rights and the borderless nature of the internet, the U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision — that Amazon's U.S. website could infringe EU and U.K. rights by targeting local buyers — offers guidance on navigating trademark rights in relation to online sales, say Emmy Hunt, Mark Kramer and Jordan Mitchell at Potter Clarkson.

  • UK Courts Continue To Struggle With Crypto-Asset Cases

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    Although the common law has proved capable of applying established principles to crypto-assets, recent cases highlight persistent challenges in identifying defendants, locating assets and determining jurisdiction, suggesting that any meaningful development will likely come from legislative or regulatory change, say Emily Saunderson and Sam Mitchell at Quadrant Chambers.

  • Why Computer Evidence Is Not Always Reliable In Court

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    Recent challenges to the admissibility of encrypted communication from the messaging tool EncroChat highlight the flawed presumption in the U.K. common law framework that computer evidence is always accurate, and why a nuanced assessment of such evidence is needed, say Sam De Silva and Josie Welland at CMS Legal.

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

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    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

  • Bias Ruling Offers Guidance On Disqualifying Arbitrators

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    An English court's recent decision in H1 v. W, removing an arbitrator due to bias concerns, reaffirms practical considerations when assessing an arbitrator's impartiality, and highlights how ill-chosen language by an arbitrator can clear the high bar for disqualification, say Andrew Connelly and Ian Meredith at K&L Gates.

  • Employer Lessons From Ruling On Prof's Anti-Zionist Views

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    In Miller v. University of Bristol, an employment tribunal recently ruled that a professor's anti-Zionist beliefs were protected by the Equality Act 2010, highlighting for employers why it’s important to carefully consider disciplinary actions related to an employee's political expressions, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • Design Rights Can Build IP Protection, EU Lego Ruling Shows

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    The EU General Court's recent ruling in Delta Sport v. EU Intellectual Property Office — that Lego's registered community design for a building block was valid — helps clarify when technically dictated designs can enjoy IP protection, and demonstrates how companies can strategically use design rights to protect and enhance their market position, says Christoph Moeller at Mewburn Ellis.

  • ECJ Ruling Clarifies Lawyer Independence Questions

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    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling in Bonnanwalt v. EU Intellectual Property Office, finding that a law firm had maintained independence despite being owned by its client, serves as a pivotal reference point to understanding the contours of legal representation before EU courts, say James Tumbridge and Benedict Sharrock-Harris at Venner Shipley.

  • Unpacking The Law Commission's Digital Assets Consultation

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    The Law Commission recently published a consultation on recognizing a third personal property category to accommodate the development of digital assets, highlighting difficulties with current models of property rights and the potential consequences of considering digital assets as personal property, say Andrew Tsang and Tom Bacon at BCLP.

  • 1st Appellate Ruling On Digital Terms Sets Tone For Disputes

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    The Court of Appeal's recent ruling in Parker-Grennan v. Camelot, the first appellate decision to consider how online terms and conditions are publicized, provides, in its tone and verdict on incorporation, an invaluable guide for how to approach similar disputes in the digital space, says Eddy Eccles at Covington.

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