Connecticut

  • March 05, 2024

    Conn. Healthcare Trade Group Drops Staffing Rule Challenge

    A healthcare trade group has dropped its suit seeking to stop Connecticut health officials from implementing new nursing home staff allocation controls in the wake of a new law increasing per-patient staffing hours.

  • March 05, 2024

    Settlement Cools Off Conn. Pizza Chain's Trademark Fight

    The parties in a long-running trademark dispute involving the Connecticut-based pizza chain Colony Grill, which twice was delivered to the Second Circuit, have permanently dropped their claims against each other in the wake of a recent settlement.

  • March 05, 2024

    2nd Circ. Hears Ex-Law Clerk's Bid To Revive Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit is considering how to move forward with a former New York law clerk's attempts to revive her sexual harassment suit after hearing from the parties on Tuesday, one day after a lower court said it would not reconsider its decision to toss the case.

  • March 05, 2024

    Aetna Accused Of 'Reprehensible' ER Services Underpayment

    Multiple Aetna health insurance entities were hit with a lawsuit in Ohio accusing them of "reprehensible systemic underpayments" to healthcare workers who provide emergency services, underpayments that the complaint said were damaging to the medical system.

  • March 04, 2024

    Snapchat Lures Victims As Bitmoji 'Co-Publisher,' Suit Says

    Two weeks after a state court judge shredded the case, two parents and a minor renewed a lawsuit against Snapchat alleging the girl was sexually assaulted by two men she met online, arguing that their case targets the platform's own cartoon-like content and not third-party posts falling under federal immunity law.

  • March 04, 2024

    Defunct Conn. Nursing School Hit With 2nd $5M Placeholder

    Connecticut Attorney General William Tong's office secured a $5 million prejudgment remedy against a shuttered nursing school over the weekend, leaving the defunct for-profit Stone Academy on the hook for $10 million in total as it continues to battle claims including breach of contract and unfair trade practices in separate lawsuits.

  • March 04, 2024

    Vexatious Litigation Claims Can't Transfer, Conn. Court Says

    A construction supplier has no basis for vexatious litigation claims against multiple attorneys, much less a claim for early remedies from them, because the allegations are tied to the company's predecessor and current company can't pursue them, a Connecticut appeals court ruled Friday.

  • March 04, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell-Led United Rentals Paying $1.1B For Yak

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP is representing equipment rental giant United Rentals in a new agreement to buy the Yak roadway matting business from Morgan Lewis-guided Platinum Equity for $1.1 billion, United said in a statement Monday. 

  • March 04, 2024

    Conn. Trial Attys Slam Proposed Offsets For Jury Awards

    Connecticut lawmakers on Monday considered a bill that could reduce economic damages awarded to personal injury and wrongful death plaintiffs when a collateral payment source, such as an insurer, has a right of subrogation, a measure that trial lawyers panned as an insurance industry perk that would undo precedent.  

  • March 01, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Barclays Exec's Whistleblower Suit

    The Second Circuit on Friday affirmed a lower court's decision to toss a whistleblower suit from a former Barclays executive, finding that he didn't sufficiently back up his allegations of retaliation under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    Conn. Lawmakers OK $25.2M Deal For 2 Jailed In 1985 Killing

    The Connecticut General Assembly's bipartisan joint judiciary committee on Friday unanimously approved a $25.2 million settlement for two men who lawmakers agreed were improperly incarcerated for more than 30 years after a chain of failures led to wrongful convictions in a December 1985 New Milford murder.

  • March 01, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Loses On NIL, DC Wins With Stadium

    In this week's Off The Bench, a judge unlocked the door to name, image and likeness money for college athletes, Shaquille O'Neal's Hollywood debut still rings true three decades later, and D.C. clears an early legislative hurdle in its bid to bring back its namesake NFL team. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 01, 2024

    In-House Atty, Ex-Hartford Mayor Among 22 Conn. Judge Noms

    Attorneys from Halloran & Sage LLP, Faxon Law Group, Brown Paindiris & Scott LLP and other Connecticut firms are among 22 nominees announced Friday for seats on the state trial court's bench, alongside an in-house counsel for The Hartford and nearly a dozen public servants, including a former mayor of the state capital.

  • March 01, 2024

    Kimberly-Clark Hit With Connecticut PFAS Class Action

    Three Connecticut residents have hit Kimberly-Clark Corp. with a proposed class action for allegedly contaminating private wells near its New Milford manufacturing plant with toxic "forever chemicals" emitted from the facility's smokestacks into the air and spread to the surrounding area.

  • March 01, 2024

    Conn. AG Tells Lawmakers To Ban MV Realty's 'Scam Deals'

    Connecticut's attorney general urged state lawmakers to protect vulnerable homeowners by passing legislation banning a business model used by MV Realty to rack up thousands in junk fees on people who sign their 40-year exclusive listing agreements.

  • February 29, 2024

    Black Detective Costume Not Protected Speech, Kraft Says

    A white manager who was fired by Kraft Heinz for wearing blackface as part of a Halloween costume in which he dressed as a character from the television show "Miami Vice" doesn't have a viable retaliation suit because his costume wasn't protected speech, the company told a Connecticut federal court.

  • February 29, 2024

    Judge Bans Adviser From Lying To Clients In $5.9M SEC Case

    A federal judge in Connecticut has imposed additional protections after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said an investment advisor accused of fraudulently raising $5.9 million lied about his reserves and claimed he could quickly repay clients, despite a previous injunction freezing assets in four Chase Bank accounts.

  • February 29, 2024

    Ex-JetBlue Flight Attendant's Subpoena Battle Heads To NY

    A former flight attendant for JetBlue Airways Corp. and her husband have dropped a legal battle that they launched Feb. 9 in Connecticut to force the airline to turn over subpoenaed documents in an underlying toxic tort case, but the federal court fight is set to continue next door.

  • February 29, 2024

    Epstein Becker Guides Conn. Hospital, NY Nonprofit Merger

    Epstein Becker Green is steering Connecticut hospital owner Nuvance Health in its planned merger with Northwell Health, New York's largest healthcare provider, a union that will create a two-state system operating under the latter nonprofit's banner.

  • February 29, 2024

    Aetna Asks Judge To Force Arbitration In Aramark ERISA Feud

    Aetna Life Insurance Co. says Aramark Services Inc. and its affiliated employee health plans ignored arbitration requirements in their contract when they filed a lawsuit in Texas accusing Aetna of mismanaging Aramark's health insurance claims, and has asked a Connecticut federal court to force the parties to arbitration there.

  • February 29, 2024

    McCarter & English Wants Ex-Client To Cough Up Extra $1.8M

    McCarter & English LLP on Thursday asked a federal judge in Connecticut to hike a prejudgment remedy order against a former client by $1.8 million, which would nearly double the original remedy of $1.85 million, arguing that interest on subsequent jury awards continues to add up as the dispute spills from federal court to the Connecticut Supreme Court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Kwok Trustee Seeks Second Judge's Help With Clawbacks

    Offering four high-profile bankruptcies as examples, the Chapter 11 trustee overseeing the $374 million case of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok has suggested that a second Connecticut bankruptcy judge could act as a mediator to help speed a deluge of 278 avoidance actions efficiently toward possible settlements.

  • February 28, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Co. Says Partner Defected With Cash, Data

    A prospective business partner agreed to commit $100,000 to join a mortgage company and promised to bring along 15 employees, but once inside, they raided business assets for information and quickly left to start a competing venture, according to a lawsuit in Connecticut state court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Halkbank Immunity Gambit Doesn't Appear To Sway 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit did not appear keen Wednesday to dismiss criminal charges accusing Halkbank of laundering over $1 billion of Iran oil proceeds, after the U.S. Supreme Court directed arguments on the Turkish state-owned lender's assertion that common-law sovereign immunity protects it.

  • February 28, 2024

    TKO Reveals Ongoing Impact Of McMahon Issues In Filing

    WWE is not immune to the personal legal battles and controversies of disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, according to a recent regulatory filing by parent company TKO.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Personal Jurisdiction Questions Mallory Leaves Unanswered

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    The due process framework that has cabined personal jurisdiction over nationwide and global businesses for the last eight decades looks increasingly precarious after this summer's fractured U.S. Supreme Court decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway Co., which left three key questions unanswered, says Andrew Rhys Davies at WilmerHale.

  • Taking A Walk Down Mandamus Lane After 2nd Circ. Ruling

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision to deny a writ of mandamus, filed by a law firm after a lower court barred it from representing a Salvadoran oil company, adds to the nuanced and sometimes conflicting mandamus case law that requires careful research before litigants seek appellate review, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Conn. Insurers Should Note Stricter Market Exit Oversight

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    The Connecticut Insurance Department recently issued a bulletin that reflects a unique and stricter approach to insurers' market withdrawals and reductions in property and casualty business, making clear that it will not assess compliance based on an insurer's intent, but on the effect of the insurer's actions, says Elizabeth Retersdorf at Day Pitney.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Why Standing Analysis Is Key In Data Breach Mediation

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    Amid a growing wave of data breach class action litigation, recent legal developments show shifting criteria for Article III standing based on an increased risk of future identity theft, meaning parties must integrate assessments of standing into mediation discussions to substantiate their settlement demands in data breach class actions, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Series

    Conn. Banking Brief: The Notable Compliance Updates In Q3

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    The most notable legal changes affecting Connecticut financial institutions in the third quarter of 2023 included increased regulatory protections for consumers, an expansion of state financial assistance for underserved communities, and a panoply of tweaks to existing laws, says Brian Rich at Barclay Damon.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Cos. Must Reassess Retaliation Risk As 2nd. Circ. Lowers Bar

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    After a recent Second Circuit decision broadened the federal standard for workplace retaliation, employers should reinforce their nondiscrimination and complaint-handling policies to help management anticipate and monitor worker grievances that could give rise to such claims, says Thomas Eron at Bond Schoeneck.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

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    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Justices Could Use Purdue To Resolve Related Circuit Split

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear Harrington v. Purdue Pharma to determine the validity of nonconsensual third-party releases in bankruptcy, but justices should also take the opportunity to resolve a related circuit split over the constitutional authority of bankruptcy judges to issue final rulings on such releases, says Benjamin Feder at Kelley Drye.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

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