More Employment Coverage

  • December 04, 2023

    Feds Accuse Texas Rehab Clinic Of $2M Workers' Comp Scam

    Federal prosecutors accused a physical therapy clinic in Texas and its owner of billing thousands of false claims to a federal workers' compensation fund, alleging that they defrauded the government of $2 million.

  • December 04, 2023

    1st Circ. Urged To Strike Fraud Convict's Self-Employment Ban

    A Maine businessman sentenced for pandemic aid fraud urged the First Circuit on Monday to erase a stipulation of his post-prison release that bars him from self-employment, arguing the judge didn't "connect the dots" between the crime and how the restriction would protect the public.

  • December 04, 2023

    Semiconductor Goals In Peril Sans Visa Fix For STEM Grads

    In the second of a three-part series focused on labor shortages, Law360 examines the types of immigration changes that will likely prove essential to President Joe Biden's ambitions to advance the U.S. as a global leader within the semiconductor industry.

  • December 01, 2023

    Prime Healthcare ERISA Judge 'Befuddled' By Class Cert. Ask

    A California federal judge on Friday questioned the standing of the three named plaintiffs seeking class certification in a federal benefits class action against Prime Healthcare Services Inc., saying she is "befuddled" about how certification would change the case at all.

  • December 01, 2023

    TikTok Parent Rips Coder's 'Gamesmanship,' Urges Arbitration

    TikTok's parent company ByteDance urged a California federal judge at a remote hearing Friday to send an engineer's wrongful termination suit accusing it of being the Chinese Communist Party's "propaganda tool" to arbitration, arguing the plaintiff has engaged in "gamesmanship" to avoid that and get to the state court's "bully pulpit."

  • December 01, 2023

    Wells Fargo Ex-CEO Says Bank Stiffing Him On $34M In Pay

    Timothy Sloan, the onetime chief executive of Wells Fargo & Co., sued the California banking giant on Friday over roughly $34 million in compensation he alleges was wrongfully withheld from him after his 2019 exit from the scandal-tarnished firm.

  • December 01, 2023

    Ex-CEO For Space Cargo Biz Can't Revive Legal Fee Suit

    Delaware's Supreme Court let stand on Friday a Court of Chancery ruling that space infrastructure company Momentus Inc. has no obligation to advance legal fees to its co-founder and former CEO after he waived most of his rights to indemnification and advancement when he left the company in 2021.

  • December 01, 2023

    Mich. Justices Leave 'Ethical Quandaries' Be In Nurse Appeal

    A divided Michigan Supreme Court has rejected the appeal of a hospital nursing manager fired for breaching patient confidentiality in a conversation with her lawyer, with two justices saying their colleagues were ducking an important question for Michigan attorneys: whether a communication with one's lawyer can be a "whistleblower" report.

  • December 01, 2023

    NJ, Governor Say Law Wasn't Passed To Oust Elections Chief

    New Jersey and its governor on Friday urged a state judge to toss claims made by the ex-chief of the state's Election Law Enforcement Commission that a state law was passed in order to remove him from his post and is unconstitutional, arguing it was well within the Legislature's power to enact the law.

  • December 01, 2023

    Voters Sue DeSantis Over Prosecutor Suspension

    Two Florida voters claim Gov. Ron DeSantis violated the U.S. Constitution when he suspended elected prosecutor Monique Worrell in August, saying in a new lawsuit that he disenfranchised the nearly 400,000 residents who voted for her.

  • December 01, 2023

    Special Visas Needed To Address Health Labor Shortages

    In the first of a three-part series focused on labor shortages, Law360 examines the immigration solutions that could help alleviate the strain on the healthcare sector.

  • December 01, 2023

    Longtime Flaster Greenberg Shareholder Dies At 74

    J. Philip Kirchner, a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg who founded the law firm's commercial litigation practice, recently died at the age of 74, the firm said this week.

  • November 30, 2023

    Kelly Clarkson's Ex Ordered By Calif. Agency To Return $2.6M

    Kelly Clarkson's former manager and ex-husband has been ordered to return $2.6 million in commissions arising from claims he unlawfully procured jobs for the singer, including a judging spot on "The Voice," according to a notice of appeal filed Wednesday in California state court.

  • November 30, 2023

    Brandr Drops Suit Against EA Over NIL Video Game Battle

    The Brandr Group LLC on Thursday dropped its lawsuit against video game giant Electronic Arts Inc. over its use of college athletes' names, images and likenesses in an upcoming video game.

  • November 30, 2023

    Ex-NFL Player Never Properly Challenged Benefits, Plan Claims

    An NFL retirement and disability plan has asked a Florida federal court to nix a lawsuit from a former Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive end who claims he wrongly missed out on a high level of injury benefits, arguing the player didn't exhaust administrative remedies before filing his complaint.

  • November 30, 2023

    Georgia Office Manager Admits To Embezzling $3.5M

    The office manager of an Atlanta-area commercial logistics company pled guilty Thursday to stealing $3.5 million from her employer and spending the money on vacations, a wedding and season tickets to college sports, according to a plea deal filed in Georgia federal court.

  • November 30, 2023

    Ohio Panel Won't Hold Drug Testing Co. Liable For Fatal Crash

    An Ohio state appeals court on Thursday refused to revive allegations that Concentra Health Services Inc. should be held liable for a fatal crash involving a tool rental company driver who beat a drug test by using synthetic urine, reasoning that Concentra had no relationship with the decedent or a survivor and therefore no duty to protect them.

  • November 30, 2023

    Bank, Employees Can't Escape Rival's Trade Secrets Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has refused to dismiss Meridian Bank's suit accusing former employees and a Maryland-based competitor bank of misappropriating Meridian's trade secrets, ruling that the suit adequately shows employment agreements signed by Meridian's former employees determine that the court has personal jurisdiction over them.

  • November 30, 2023

    Drug Cabinet Finger Scans Are BIPA-Exempt, Ill. Justices Say

    The Biometric Information Privacy Act doesn't protect health care workers whose fingerprints are collected, stored and used to access medications and medical supplies, the Illinois Supreme Court said Thursday, though it cautioned the ruling shouldn't block all BIPA suits from health care workers. 

  • November 30, 2023

    Colo. Ordered To Turn Over Workers' Comp Data To Feds

    A Colorado federal judge has ordered state labor officials to turn over workers' compensation records sought by a U.S. Social Security Administration watchdog as part of a multi-state audit, ruling the agency's authority preempts a Colorado law designating those records as confidential.

  • November 30, 2023

    Hertz Resolves Lime's Trade Secrets Suit

    A California federal court has signed off on an agreement to end scooter company Lime's suit alleging Hertz knew one of its newly hired engineers used Lime's confidential information to build a new app.

  • November 30, 2023

    Littler, Ex-Firm Atty Agree To Pause In Doc Theft Showdown

    Littler Mendelson PC and a former firm attorney have agreed to pause the firm's Texas state lawsuit alleging she stole confidential documents, with the reason for hitting the brakes on the hard-fought case unclear.

  • November 29, 2023

    OCC's Hiring Of Ex-Fintech Official Could Get House Scrutiny

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency could face public scrutiny from House lawmakers as soon as next week over how it managed to appoint a top fintech official whose resume appears to have been significantly fabricated.

  • November 29, 2023

    Ga. Judge Regrets 'Harsh' Email's Wording, Not Its Message

    A Douglas County, Georgia, probate judge's contentious working relationship with the county's now-retired chief judge, who she suggested was a racist and should retire after her after-hours courthouse access was temporarily revoked, took center stage Wednesday as she testified in the state judicial watchdog's sweeping ethics case against her.

  • November 29, 2023

    Hospital Not Liable For $26M Verdict, NJ Justices Told

    A Garden State hospital on Wednesday told the New Jersey Supreme Court that a $26 million award to a group of neurosurgeons after a four-week trial should be tossed, arguing the claim the jurors found it liable for should have never made it to the jury in the first place.

Expert Analysis

  • Legal Lessons From Past World Cups To Keep In Mind For '26

    Author Photo

    The 2022 World Cup in Qatar and the 2023 Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand set new standards for sustainability, human rights and sponsorship — and with those new standards come new challenges for those involved in the planning of the 2026 World Cup in North America, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

    Author Photo

    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • A Look At Mass. Sports Betting Data Privacy Regulations

    Author Photo

    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission recently approved data privacy regulations under the state's sports wagering act to promote responsible gaming, showing a trend of regulators directing companies on how to protect personal information used by artificial intelligence systems, say Liisa Thomas and Kathryn Smith at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Title IX Grievance Rules Raise Due Process Questions

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Education’s proposed Title IX regulations for campus disciplinary proceedings would ease the administrative burden on institutions, but raise fairness and due process questions that will likely lead to follow-on litigation, say Markus Funk and Christopher Wilkinson at Perkins Coie.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Why Criminal No-Poach Cases Can Be Deceptively Complex

    Author Photo

    Mark Rosman at Wilson Sonsini discusses the reasons many criminal no-poach cases that appear simple are actually more complicated than they seem, following several jury trial acquittals and two dismissed cases.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • SEC Whistleblower Action Spotlights Risks For Private Cos.

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s recent whistleblower action against Monolith Resources holds important implications for private companies, who could face unprecedented regulatory scrutiny amid the agency's efforts to beef up environmental, social and governance reporting and enforcement, say attorneys at Wiley.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.