Florida

  • March 13, 2024

    Ex-CFO Raided Corporate Funds, Trulieve Suit Claims

    Florida's largest medical marijuana company, Trulieve, is suing its former chief financial officer in federal court, claiming he misused his corporate credit card, charging "hundreds of thousands of dollars" for expensive clothing, vacations and attorney fees and fraudulently received reimbursement for personal expenses.

  • March 13, 2024

    Florida Inmate Indicted For Threatening To Kill Federal Judge

    An inmate serving time in a Florida state prison for violent crimes has been indicted for allegedly sending letters on three dates last year that threatened to kill a U.S. district judge, prosecutors announced this week.

  • March 13, 2024

    Fla. Ex-Municipal Atty Alleges LGBTQ Discrimination

    A gay former town attorney for Pembroke Park, Florida, has launched a state lawsuit alleging that she was unlawfully fired as a result of "a campaign of discrimination and harassment" against her from a town commissioner on account of her sexual orientation.

  • March 12, 2024

    'Schrodinger's Gun' Beats ATF Bid To Defeat Pistol-Brace Suit

    A firearms retailer can move forward with its lawsuit challenging the Biden administration's rule change classifying pistols fitted with stabilizing braces as short-barreled rifles, a Florida federal judge ruled, saying the "bar for overcoming" a Second Amendment claim "has recently been raised — significantly."

  • March 12, 2024

    Binance Investors Must Wait To Depose Ex-CEO, Judge Says

    A Florida federal judge has said that the investors suing crypto exchange Binance over alleged money laundering and securities law violations don't need to rush to depose its former CEO, Changpeng Zhao, now that his criminal sentencing has been delayed.

  • March 12, 2024

    HUD Withholds Refunds Due To Homeowners, Suit Says

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development was hit Tuesday with a proposed class action in Florida accusing the agency of failing to refund homeowners $384 million in mortgage insurance premium overpayments when they terminated their government-backed mortgages early.

  • March 12, 2024

    Judge Tosses Defamation Suit By Meghan Markle's Half-Sister

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday dismissed a defamation lawsuit against Meghan Markle brought by her half-sister over remarks made during an Oprah Winfrey interview and a Netflix documentary series, saying some of the statements aren't attributable to the Duchess of Sussex and others are protected opinion. 

  • March 12, 2024

    MV Realty Says NC AG Is Working For Real Estate Industry

    Embattled Florida-based real estate company MV Realty told the North Carolina Supreme Court the state's attorney general is "wielding the power of the state under the guise of consumer protection" to shut down the business at the behest of "entrenched real estate brokerage interests."

  • March 12, 2024

    2 Miami Police Employees Plead Guilty To COVID Relief Fraud

    Two former Miami Police Department employees, one of whom is the sister of ex-Miami Heat player Udonis Haslem, have pled guilty to felony charges for their roles in separate COVID-19 relief fraud schemes, federal prosecutors announced Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    Gunmaker, Insurer Settle Coverage Of NY 'Ghost Gun' Suits

    A gunmaker accused by the New York attorney general and two cities of facilitating the creation of so-called ghost guns has reached a coverage settlement with one of its insurers, the parties told a Florida federal court Tuesday, leaving the gunmaker's coverage claims against another insurer still pending.

  • March 12, 2024

    Ghislaine Maxwell's Longshot Appeal Centers On Epstein Deal

    Jeffrey Epstein's Florida non-prosecution deal loomed large Tuesday in the Second Circuit as imprisoned socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, in what seemed like an unlikely bid for freedom, argued that it shields her from New York charges of trafficking girls for the deceased financier.

  • March 12, 2024

    Ex-Jaguars Employee Gets 6.5 Years For $22M Embezzlement

    A Florida federal judge sentenced former Jacksonville Jaguars finance employee Amit Patel to six years and six months in prison Tuesday after he pled guilty last year to embezzling more than $22 million from the team that was eventually used for online gambling.

  • March 12, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Golf Course Volunteers Aren't Owed Pay

    The Eleventh Circuit agreed with a lower court's dismissal of a wage lawsuit brought by attendants at a golf course owned by Palm Beach County, Florida, saying Tuesday that the workers were not owed wages under federal labor law because they knew they signed up for volunteer positions.

  • March 12, 2024

    Pharmacy Calls $11M False Claims Case A 'House Of Cards'

    A compounding pharmacy and its president trashed the Connecticut attorney general's $11 million false claims and kickback allegations against them as a "house of cards" that awarded "a sweetheart cooperation deal" to an alleged co-conspirator and improperly benefited private attorneys, calling instead for a judgment against the state.

  • March 12, 2024

    Businessman Hid $20M In Swiss Accounts, US Says

    A Brazilian-American businessman hid $20 million from the Internal Revenue Service over 35 years using accounts at Swiss banks including UBS and Credit Suisse, the U.S. government said in a criminal complaint that accuses him of conspiring to defraud the U.S. and lying to authorities.

  • March 11, 2024

    Lyft Wants Out Of Rape Survivor's 'Untimely' Negligence Suit

    Lyft Inc. has urged a California federal judge to toss a passenger's suit accusing the ride-hailing service of failing to protect her from a violent predator who raped her and got her pregnant, saying she filed the suit too late under both California and Florida law.

  • March 11, 2024

    Fla. Judge Says Campaign Speech Didn't Violate Ethics Rules

    A Florida state court judge charged with ethics violations is attempting to stop a disciplinary panel from presenting evidence that a speech she made during a campaign against a rival in 2022 violated the Florida Code of Judicial Conduct, saying that it's protected by the First Amendment.

  • March 11, 2024

    Fla. Biz Owner Says Insurer Left Co. On Hook For $12M Award

    The owner of a Florida Keys construction and landscaping company told federal jurors Monday that it made no sense for National Indemnity Company of the South to tender the policy limits to his employee involved in a fatal crash while leaving the company exposed and forced to go to trial, where it was hit with an $11.8 million judgment.

  • March 11, 2024

    Hertz Tells Chancery To Reject $4B Buyback 'Hindsight' Suit

    Hertz directors weren't certain when they authorized $4 billion in stock buybacks that it would transfer control of the company to a private equity-backed shareholder, an attorney for Hertz told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Monday, urging the court to toss a shareholder's lawsuit over the buybacks.

  • March 11, 2024

    US Appeals Corporate Transparency Act Ruling To 11th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury is moving quickly to appeal an Alabama federal judge's ruling that the Corporate Transparency Act is unconstitutional, filing a notice of appeal to the Eleventh Circuit on Monday.

  • March 11, 2024

    Souped-Up Mustangs Overheated After 10 Min., Fla. Jury Told

    A group of drivers suing Ford Motor Co. told a Florida federal jury on Monday that the carmaker misled them on the high-performance capabilities of the 2016 Shelby GT350 Mustangs they purchased, saying that the vehicles overheated after about 10 minutes of racing them on a track.

  • March 11, 2024

    Walmart Fails To Sink Feds' Opioid Crisis Lawsuit

    A Delaware federal judge on Monday kept alive a government lawsuit accusing Walmart of fueling the nation's opioid crisis, ruling that the company could be held liable for filling illegitimate prescriptions its compliance officers allegedly failed to flag for unwitting pharmacists.

  • March 11, 2024

    FTC, 10 States Sue 'Sham' Women's Cancer Fund

    The Federal Trade Commission and 10 state attorneys general have filed a federal complaint against a Pennsylvania-based cancer charity fund, calling the foundation a "sham" that deceived donors out of $18 million over five years.

  • March 11, 2024

    Trump Wants NY Trial Paused As Justices Weigh Immunity

    Donald Trump asked a New York judge to pause his hush-money case to await a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a separate case on whether he is shielded from criminal charges by presidential immunity.

  • March 11, 2024

    DLA Piper Adds Cooley Atty To Co-Lead Capital Markets Team

    DLA Piper announced Monday it has added a former Cooley LLP partner with deep experience working with life sciences clients and in cross-border transactions to co-lead the firm's capital markets and public company advisory practice group.

Expert Analysis

  • Trends Emerge In High Court's Criminal Law Decisions

    Author Photo

    In its 2022-2023 term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued nine merits decisions in criminal cases covering a wide range of issues, and while each decision is independently important, when viewed together, key trends and takeaways appear that will affect defendants moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

    Author Photo

    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

    Author Photo

    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Why All Eyes Are On Florida's Affordable Housing Reform

    Author Photo

    Florida's Live Local Act, which took effect last month, promotes much-needed affordable housing developments with a mix of zoning preemption provisions and tax benefits that may attract interest from developers across the nation, say attorneys at Nelson Mullins.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

    Author Photo

    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • ESG Mandates For Banks May Bring Compliance Challenges

    Author Photo

    As jurisdictions expand their ESG or anti-ESG mandates to encompass banks that hold public funds, depository institutions should prepare to dedicate meaningful resources to these new requirements, and expect a few bumps in the road as the debate over use of environmental, social and corporate governance factors continues in the U.S., say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Opinion

    Justices' Job Transfer Review Should Hold To Title VII Text

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Muldrow v. City of St. Louis should hold that a job transfer can be an adverse employment action, and the analysis should be based on the straightforward language of Title VII rather than judicial activism, say Lynne Bernabei and Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling May Impede Insurers' Defense Cost Recoup

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Continental Casualty v. Winder Laboratories ruling that insurers cannot obtain reimbursement of defense costs from their insureds where the policy itself does not require such reimbursement is likely to be cited as persuasive authority in Georgia and other states without clear precedent on the issue, say Christy Maple and Robert Whitney at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Senate Hearing Highlights Antitrust Hazards In PGA-LIV Deal

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Senate's recent questioning of PGA Tour COO Ron Price on the proposed deal with LIV Golf and its release of a dossier of framework agreements covered a variety of issues that could exacerbate antitrust concerns, including the predatory purchasing theory of competitive harm, free-riding and alternate funding, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Ch. 11 Ruling Informs On Social Media Ownership Rights

    Author Photo

    Social media users now have useful guidance regarding account ownership rights following a federal bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the Vital Pharmaceuticals Chapter 11 case, which rejected the notion that advertised content alone could create a presumption of ownership for the advertised business, say Deborah Enea and Thomas Dockery at Troutman Pepper.

  • The Hurdles Of Class Noticing In Crypto Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Amid the growing number of cryptocurrency-related class action lawsuits, there are challenges relating to notifying potential class members, as the methods for traditional class actions may not work in these cases, say Loree Kovach and Nicholas Schmidt at Epiq.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

    Author Photo

    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Parsing FTC's Intercontinental-Black Knight Merger Challenge

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's recent Article III case challenging a merger between Intercontinental Exchange and Black Knight suggests the agency is using a structuralist approach to evaluate the merger's potential anti-competitive harm, says David Evans at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

    Author Photo

    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Florida archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!