Florida

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Atty Wants $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction Axed

    A Florida attorney convicted of conspiring to defraud a U.S. coronavirus pandemic relief program has asked a Georgia federal judge to vacate the jury's guilty verdict and either acquit her or order a new trial, arguing the government violated her due process rights by not submitting sufficient evidence to prove her guilt.

  • February 12, 2024

    Martin Marietta Paying $2B For Blue Water Raw Materials Ops

    Cravath-advised building materials supplier Martin Marietta Materials Inc. said Monday it has agreed to buy 20 active aggregate operations across five states from Blue Water Industries LLC, represented by Wachtell Lipton, for $2.05 billion in cash. 

  • February 11, 2024

    Rise In Billing For Catheters May Signal $2B Medicare Fraud

    Seven companies may have fraudulently billed Medicare by as much as $2 billion over two years for medical supplies that were never requested or received, according to an analysis by a Washington, D.C.-based group representing healthcare providers.

  • February 09, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Neumann's WeWork Reboot?

    Law360 Real Estate Authority covers the most important real estate deals, litigation, policies and trends. Catch up on this week's key developments in California, Florida and New York — as well as the obstacles WeWork founder Adam Neumann faces if he tries to reclaim the struggling company that ousted him.

  • February 09, 2024

    SEC's 'Orwellian' Trade Database Is Unlawful, 11th Circ. Told

    Citadel Securities LLC and the American Securities Association have laid out their objections to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission directive that requires brokerage firms to fund the buildup of a database known as the consolidated audit trail, telling the Eleventh Circuit that the tool created an "Orwellian surveillance regime" that puts American investors at risk of being hacked.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fla. Judge Won't Halt Alleged 'Payback' By Miami Official

    A Florida federal judge on Friday declined to issue an injunction against a Miami city commissioner who's accused of continuing his campaign of retaliation against two business owners despite a $63.5 million judgment against him for the same conduct, saying the proposed order is too vague.

  • February 09, 2024

    Cigar Co. Doesn't Own 'Dragon' TM, Rival's Dismissal Bid Says

    The defendant in a trademark infringement suit from a cigar company has asked a Florida federal court to dismiss the case, saying that the plaintiff doesn't even own the registered marks it claims were infringed.

  • February 09, 2024

    Costco Sold Listeria-Contaminated Chicken Wraps, Suit Says

    A customer who alleges he fell ill and was hospitalized after eating chicken wraps contaminated with listeria that he bought from Costco filed a putative class action against Costco and two food manufacturers in Florida federal court Friday, asserting claims for negligence and unfair trade practices.

  • February 09, 2024

    FSU Board Demands Dismissal Of ACC's Preemptive Suit

    Florida State University is pushing for the dismissal of the Atlantic Coast Conference's North Carolina state lawsuit, saying it was prematurely filed to preempt the university's own suit against the conference, in an attempt to win a "race to the courthouse" and in violation of the conference's own rules.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Gov't Win In Fla. University's Patent Dispute

    A Federal Circuit panel has affirmed the rejection of a Florida university's infringement suit against the U.S. government over its patent on lab mice used to study Alzheimer's disease, ruling the 1980 law governing patents developed through federally funded research can apply to work that predates a funding agreement.

  • February 09, 2024

    Jewish Divorce Can't Shield Spouse From $21.8M Order In Fla.

    Florida appellate judges have denied a petition by the owner of a moving company to review an order compelling him to provide financial information to satisfy a $21.8 million judgment in connection with deceptive business practices, after a lower court said a religious divorce didn't preclude his wife from disclosing assets.

  • February 09, 2024

    Healthcare Cybersecurity Bill Puts Focus On HHS Oversight

    Members of a U.S. Senate cybersecurity commission introduced a bill Friday that would require federal health officials to conduct regular evaluations of digital security systems and issue biennial reports to Congress.

  • February 09, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Restore Sex Trafficking Suit Against Ga. Hotel

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday rejected a woman's attempt to revive her lawsuit claiming that a Georgia hotel owner knowingly benefited from years of her forced prostitution, ruling there wasn't enough evidence to show the company took part in sex trafficking.

  • February 09, 2024

    No Need For Anonymity In Fla. Immigration Suit, Judge Rules

    A Florida federal judge denied a bid by affected individuals to proceed anonymously in their challenge to a state law making transporting unauthorized immigrants a crime, ruling the individuals' privacy concerns aren't exceptional enough to warrant anonymity.

  • February 09, 2024

    EB-5 Visa Fraud Suit Should Be Stayed, Court Hears

    A man accused of defrauding green-card hopefuls of millions of dollars through a visa program for foreign investors has asked a Florida federal court to pause claims against him while he appeals a decision refusing to send the case to arbitration.

  • February 09, 2024

    2023 Patent Litigation: A Year In Review

    Attorneys filed fewer patent suits in district courts in 2023 than in any year for more than a decade, and the amount of America Invents Act petitions at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board fell to a 10-year low as well. The Western District of Texas also lost its place as the most popular patent litigation venue in the U.S. in 2023, with the Eastern District of Texas overtaking it.

  • February 09, 2024

    Kaufman Dolowich Adds Ex-Financial Services CLO In Fla.

    Kaufman Dolowich has added the former chief legal and compliance officer for accounts receivable management firm Vengroff Williams Inc., one of the firm's clients, to its Orlando, Florida, office.

  • February 09, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA NIL Rule Lives; Dartmouth Players Win

    In this week's Off The Bench, a Tennessee judge sends mixed signals to the NCAA in the fight over its NIL recruiting ban, Dartmouth's basketball players tally a win for college athletes' unionization efforts, and DraftKings tries to stop rival Fanatics from benefiting from a former executive who switched sides. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • February 09, 2024

    CORRECTED: 11th Circ. Says Guilty Plea Sinks Appeal In Investment Fraud Case

    The Eleventh Circuit declined to take up the appeal of a man who pled guilty to wire fraud after being accused of stealing investment funds from a wealthy widow, ruling that his plea was unconditional. Correction: A previous version of this story misidentified the defendant and had an incorrect case number and counsel information. The errors have been corrected.

  • February 09, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Will Ask Justices To Toss Mexico Trafficking Suit

    Smith & Wesson, Glock, Baretta and other gun companies said during a hearing Friday that they will turn to the U.S. Supreme Court after the First Circuit revived a suit by the Mexican government that seeks to hold the firearms industry responsible for thousands of trafficked weapons.

  • February 09, 2024

    Owens Corning To Buy Door-Maker Masonite In $3.9B Deal

    Ohio-based construction materials manufacturer Owens Corning said Friday it has inked a $3.9 billion agreement to buy Tampa, Florida-based door-maker Masonite International Corp., just weeks after the latter company's earlier effort to buy PGT Innovations Inc. fell through.

  • February 08, 2024

    Walmart Settles With EEOC Over Fla. Worker Harassment

    Walmart has resolved a lawsuit brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, agreeing Thursday to train supervisors at a north Florida facility on how to prevent sexual harassment after an employee alleged the company mishandled her complaints about a co-worker and fired her in retaliation.

  • February 08, 2024

    M&T Bank's Freeze 'Crumbled' Fla. Law Firm, $1.5M Suit Says

    A Florida law firm has sued M&T Bank for $1.5 million in Tampa federal court over allegations that the bank "crumbled" the firm's business by unreasonably restricting its trust account during a recent chargeback dispute.

  • February 08, 2024

    Cannabis Co. Sues Colorado Regulators Over Tracking Rules

    A Colorado company that makes edible cannabis products has sued state regulators over what it describes as a confusing series of regulatory moves in recent months regarding the tracking of cannabis products and their insistence on the use of a particular tracking device through a state contractor.

  • February 08, 2024

    Del. Chancery Questions Broker's 'Ornate' Board Control Fix

    Bylaw amendments adopted by insurance broker BRP Group Inc. in response to a shareholder's complaint that its co-founders wielded too much control over the company's board may have "narrowed" the problem but did not necessarily eliminate it, a Delaware Chancery Court vice chancellor said Thursday at a hearing in Wilmington.

Expert Analysis

  • Insurers Should Prepare For 'Black Swan' Climate Disasters

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    As rapid climate change results in increased risk of casualties and property loss from rare, severe weather events, the insurance industry should take five crucial steps toward evolving and continuing operations, including advanced analytic techniques and investments in alternative energy sources, say Stephen Brown and Irena Maier at Wilson Elser.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Compliance Primer: Foreign Investment In US Real Property

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    The rise in foreign investment in U.S. real property, especially agricultural land, has led to increased national security concerns, meaning it’s important to understand reporting requirements under the Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act and state-level statutes, and to monitor legislative proposals that could create more stringent reporting and review processes, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Nix Section 230 Immunity For Tech

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed to decide two new cases that present another opening to curtail the broad immunity enjoyed by tech company-owned social media platforms under Section 230, and it's long past time for online publishers to be treated the same as traditional ones, says Douglas Mirell at Greenberg Glusker.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • What Panama Canal Award Ruling Means For Int'l Arbitration

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    As the prevalence of international arbitration grows, the Eighth Circuit’s recent decision in Grupo Unidos v. Canal de Panama may change how practitioners decide what remedies to seek and where to raise them if claims are rejected, says Jerry Roth at FedArb.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 5th Amendment Lessons From Trump Secret Docs Case

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    Former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago classified documents indictment reminds attorneys that responding early and relying on constitutional protections can help protect clients from obstruction charges while still allowing them to refrain from producing subpoenaed documents, says Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

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