Government Contracts

  • February 08, 2024

    DOL Seeks To Ax Challenge To New Davis-Bacon Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor has asked a Texas federal judge to toss the Associated Builders and Contractors' lawsuit seeking to stop the agency from enforcing a final rule regarding prevailing wage rates for federal construction projects, saying the group didn't show how the rule would harm its members.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ga. Judge Hits Medicare Fraud Duo With 37-Month Sentences

    A Georgia federal judge on Thursday sentenced a man and woman to 37-month prison sentences for their role in a scheme that used their marketing company to trade doctors' medical device orders and rip off Medicare for more than $1.5 million.

  • February 08, 2024

    2nd Circ. Appoints Goodwin To Suit Over Fake Pot In NY Jail

    The Second Circuit has revived an incarcerated man's lawsuit seeking damages for his exposure to secondhand smoke from synthetic cannabinoid illicitly smuggled into a jail in Orange County, New York, saying his case has "potential merit," and appointed Goodwin Procter LLP as his counsel.

  • February 08, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Group Of The Year: Bradley Arant

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP's recent work in multiple high-stakes bid protests, including scoring a precedent-setting decision that helped secure a $2.6 billion U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement contract for its client, have earned the firm a spot as one of Law360's 2023 Government Contracts Groups of the Year.

  • February 08, 2024

    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • February 08, 2024

    Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

  • February 07, 2024

    Judge Newman's Options Dwindle After Suspension Is Upheld

    Following Wednesday's decision by the national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases upholding Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension, she faces a difficult path to getting reinstated without complying with an investigation into her mental fitness, experts say.

  • February 07, 2024

    Chinese Hackers Accessed Infrastructure For Years, US Warns

    United States intelligence agencies and allies confirmed on Wednesday that a Chinese state-sponsored hacker group called Volt Typhoon has infiltrated critical industries, including communications, transportation, energy, and water and wastewater systems, some of which have been compromised for at least five years.

  • February 07, 2024

    Supplier Says 'Eleventh-Hour' Lockheed Claim Doesn't Belong

    A titanium parts supplier has told a Texas federal judge that it's too late for Lockheed Martin Corp. to add a claim to its lawsuit seeking to force the supplier to deliver F-35 parts, saying the defense giant was merely strategizing.

  • February 07, 2024

    NC Public Housing Exec Gets Prison In Bid-Rigging Scheme

    A county housing director in North Carolina was sentenced Wednesday to 30 months in prison after she pled guilty to a conspiracy charge stemming from a scheme to funnel public housing contracts to her friends and family, prosecutors said.

  • February 07, 2024

    Board Says Facts Need Sussing In ICE, Charter Biz $64M Battle

    The U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has refused to grant summary judgment to either U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or an airline charter in a $64 million fight over canceled flights, saying too many factual disputes remain in the case.

  • February 07, 2024

    Contractor Admits To Sourcing Vital Military Parts Abroad

    A defense contractor admitted to illegally obtaining parts for the U.S. military from China and other foreign countries on contracts requiring the items to be purchased from domestic companies, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    NJ Panel Backs Retired Cops In Health Insurance Dispute

    Retired police officers for a New Jersey township are entitled to full healthcare benefits without premium payments under a collective bargaining agreement, a state appellate panel ruled Wednesday, upholding an arbitration decision in the police officers' union's favor.

  • February 07, 2024

    Firefighters Won't Receive Pension Hike, Conn. Justices Rule

    Firefighters who voluntarily retired during ongoing collective bargaining proceedings are not entitled to increased pension benefits corresponding with retroactive wage increases, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled.

  • February 07, 2024

    Insurers Reach Agreement In School Construction Injury Suit

    Travelers has ended its dispute over whether another insurer must defend a general contractor, school district and construction manager in a worker's personal injury lawsuit as additional insureds, after a New York federal judge on Wednesday approved the parties' mutual request to drop the action.

  • February 07, 2024

    Mass. Residents Want High Court To Undo Tribe's Land Grant

    A group of Massachusetts residents are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a ruling that allowed the U.S. Department of the Interior to take 321 acres into trust for the development of a billion-dollar tribal hotel and casino, arguing that a lower court ignored precedent in determining that the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe is under federal jurisdiction.

  • February 07, 2024

    Judge Newman's Suspension Upheld By US Panel

    The national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases on Wednesday affirmed Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension for refusing to undergo medical tests as part of a probe into her mental fitness, saying she hadn't shown good cause for not complying.

  • February 06, 2024

    SpaceX Accused Of Sex Harassment, Retaliation In Calif.

    California's Civil Rights Department has received complaints that SpaceX has fired engineers who raised concerns about sexual harassment, gender discrimination and a hostile work environment created by CEO Elon Musk's public comments, according to complaints viewed by Law360 on Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Review $1.3B India Award Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday refused to revisit its decision overturning the enforcement of a $1.3 billion arbitral award issued to an Indian satellite communications company on jurisdictional grounds, despite a scathing dissent from several judges criticizing the appellate court's outlier position on the relevant issue.

  • February 06, 2024

    Judge Accepts DHA's Course-Correct For $65B Tricare Deal

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims explained Tuesday why it cleared an embattled deal for healthcare services for the U.S. Department of Defense, saying the department appropriately handled claims challenging the winning company's small business participation plan.

  • February 06, 2024

    9th Circ. To DOL In Wage Rule Case: 'That's Just Not True'

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Tuesday appeared to push back against the federal government's argument that the U.S. Department of Labor's federal contract worker minimum wage rule is lawful because it promotes economy and efficiency.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Contech Exec Asks 4th Circ. To Toss More Convictions

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the former Contech executive who was convicted of bid-rigging both agree that the Fourth Circuit should rethink the decision that wiped out that conviction, but for different reasons — one wants the conviction reinstated, while the other says the panel didn't go far enough.

  • February 06, 2024

    Express Scripts Cites Low Bar To Keep AG Suit In Fed. Court

    Pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts Inc. pressed the Ninth Circuit on Monday to let it force its part of a California attorney general antitrust suit over skyrocketing insulin prices into federal court, arguing the enforcer and a U.S. district judge imposed the wrong standards in sending the case back to state court.

  • February 06, 2024

    70 Arrested In NYC Public Housing Bribery Bust

    Dozens of current and former New York City public housing workers were arrested Tuesday in an anti-corruption sweep described by the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office as featuring the highest number of federal bribery and extortion charges issued in a single day.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-NYPD Official Cops To NYC Mayor Straw Donor Scam

    A retired New York Police Department inspector and longtime ally of New York City Mayor Eric Adams on Monday pled guilty in Manhattan state court to a misdemeanor conspiracy charge for his part in a scheme to use straw donors to inflate public funding of the mayor's 2021 campaign.

Expert Analysis

  • Bribery Bill Fills Gap In Foreign Corruption Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Congress recently passed the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act, significantly expanding the U.S. government's ability to prosecute foreign officials who seek or demand bribes, but if enacted, the legislation could also create tension with other nations, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray and Mayer Brown.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

    Author Photo

    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Contract Claims Recap: Termination and Accrual

    Author Photo

    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Gifts That May Run Afoul Of Government Ethics Rules

    Author Photo

    As the holiday season ramps up, it’s essential to keep in mind that government officials and employees are all subject to specific gift rules, and related violations can lead to consequences far worse than coal in one’s stocking, say Mark Renaud and Rob Walker at Wiley.

  • What DOD Commercial Product Rule Means For Contractors

    Author Photo

    A recent amendment to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, along with forthcoming changes to the definition of what constitutes a subcontract, will offer some relief for commercial products and services contractors, but the U.S. Department of Defense should do more to reduce regulatory burdens, say Daniel Ramish and Jonathan Shaffer at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Inside New Classified Contract Guidance For Joint Ventures

    Author Photo

    A recent Information Security Oversight Office notice clarifies the interplay between small business joint-venture rules and eligibility determinations for U.S. Department of Defense classified contracts, but it's still unclear how this should be interpreted for non-DOD procurements, says Todd Overman at Bass Berry.

  • Opinion

    Giving The Gov't Drug Patent March-In Authority Is Bad Policy

    Author Photo

    The Biden administration's recent proposal to allow government seizure of certain taxpayer-funded drug patents is a terrible idea that would negate the benefits of government-funded research, to the detriment of patients and the wider economy, says Wayne Winegarden at Pacific Research Institute.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

    Author Photo

    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

    Author Photo

    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

    Author Photo

    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Inside DOD's Final Commercial Products And Services Rule

    Author Photo

    The recently released final amendment of a Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement provision will help streamline negotiations over subcontracts that provide commercial products and services, but its failure to address certain key questions means government contractors must still await further guidance, say Alex Sarria and Connor Farrell at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Government Contracts archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!