Government Contracts

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-NYPD Official Cops To NYC Mayor Straw Donor Scam

    A retired New York Police Department inspector and longtime ally of New York City Mayor Eric Adams on Monday pled guilty in Manhattan state court to a misdemeanor conspiracy charge for his part in a scheme to use straw donors to inflate public funding of the mayor's 2021 campaign.

  • February 05, 2024

    SEC's SolarWinds Suit May Chill Disclosures, Ex-Officials Say

    A group of 21 former government officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations has urged a New York federal court to consider the possible chilling effects of public-private information sharing on cyber incidents in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against SolarWinds.

  • February 05, 2024

    Wash. Labor Dept. Says ICE Facility Operator Blocking Probes

    Washington state's labor department has alleged in a complaint moved to federal court that private prison operator GEO Secure Services LLC is illegally blocking inspectors from enforcing state workplace safety laws at an immigration detention facility.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Wants 'Public Servant' Cut From FCPA Case

    A former Texas oil trader accused of bribery by federal prosecutors in New York has asked a judge to reject the government's argument that employees of a U.S.-based affiliate of Mexico's state-owned oil company should be considered "public servants" under Mexico's anti-bribery law.

  • February 05, 2024

    Military Store Service Sued For Not Prioritizing Blind Vendors

    A military base store service run by the U.S. Department of Defense was sued in Texas federal court Friday for allegedly violating laws prioritizing blind merchants for opportunities to operate vending facilities on military bases when it opened a Fresh Market and other shops, while removing machines owned by blind merchants.

  • February 05, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Nabs Space Pro From Sherman & Howard

    Greenberg Traurig LLP announced Monday that it has hired former U.S. Air Force director of space law and chair of Sherman & Howard LLC's aerospace practice group Milton "Skip" Smith to head its space and satellite industry group.

  • February 05, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Adds Real Estate Vet In Miami Office

    Philadelphia-based firm Fox Rothschild LLP has welcomed a commercial real estate attorney with more than 20 years of experience to its Miami office, the firm announced Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Discrepancy In Co. Name Can't Sink $4.5M Army Deal Dispute

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has allowed an Iraqi contractor to proceed with its $4.5 million dispute over alleged unpaid invoices under a construction equipment deal, rejecting the U.S. Army's arguments that the claim and contract involved two different companies.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Honeywell Engineer's Fraud, Equal Pay, Leave Suit Axed

    A former Honeywell engineer could not prove she was engaging in protected activity by calling attention to fraud under a U.S. Navy contract, an Arizona federal judge has ruled, saying flagging compliance issues is not the same as investigating fraudulent activity.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Ky. Prosecutor Convicted Of Trading Legal Favors For Sex

    A federal jury found a former Kentucky state prosecutor guilty of assisting a criminal defendant in exchange for sexual favors and explicit photos, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Saturday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Hires Wiley Atty As Gov't Contracts Lead

    Cozen O'Connor has hired a more-than 25-year veteran of Wiley Rein LLP, who joins the firm to help co-chair its government contracts practice from its Washington, D.C., office, according to a Monday announcement.

  • February 05, 2024

    States, Enviro Groups Expand Suits Over USPS' New Vehicles

    Environmentalists and a coalition of states broadened their California federal court challenges to the U.S. Postal Service's decision to replace its aging delivery fleet with "gas-guzzling vehicles" powered by internal combustion engines, saying it failed to consider lower-emission alternatives.

  • February 02, 2024

    Health Net Loses Bid To Stop $65B Contract Award

    The U.S. Department of Defense prevailed over Health Net's challenge to a $65 billion contract award to TriWest Healthcare Alliance, as a U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge ruled Friday that TriWest's bid passed fair and square.

  • February 02, 2024

    Biden's Small Biz Contract Plan In Need Of Definitive Regs

    A White House plan to include more small businesses in multiple-award government contracts could backfire if regulations to implement the plan don't define terms such as when companies can be added to the contracts or given preference for specific tasks under the contracts. 

  • February 02, 2024

    Monsanto Can't Wash Away Seattle's PCB Water Pollution Suit

    A Washington federal judge on Friday denied Monsanto's summary judgment bid in Seattle's complaint over polychlorinated biphenyl pollution in its waterways, ruling there are still significant factual disputes in play, including whether and to what extent PCBs traceable to Monsanto comprise the amount found in the city's water.

  • February 02, 2024

    US Chamber Calls SEC SolarWinds Suit An FCPA 'Power Grab'

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Friday urged a New York federal court to ax the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's suit against software provider SolarWinds Corp., saying the agency is using a provision of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act as a power grab for broader corporate policing authority.

  • February 02, 2024

    ACLU Atty On How To Protect Civil Liberties In The AI Era

    Because artificial intelligence and algorithmic systems often operate in the shadows, there's a new need for legislation, regulation and enforcement to ensure the technology doesn't undercut civil liberties by engaging in discrimination in housing, education or employment, according to Cody Venzke, senior policy counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • February 02, 2024

    Court's Claims Of Internal Dispute A Myth, Tribe Tells Fed. Circ.

    The Winnemucca Indian Colony is asking the Federal Circuit to overturn a decision that dismissed allegations in a $208 million breach of trust suit against the Bureau of Indian Affairs, saying the Court of Federal Claims wrongly characterized the events that underpinned its litigation as an internal dispute within the tribe.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mich. Prevailing Wage Policy Gets Appellate Court's Backing

    A Michigan agency did not overstep its authority when it required that workers on certain state-funded construction projects be paid a prevailing wage, an appellate court panel has ruled, finding the Legislature's repeal of the Prevailing Wage Act did not remove the agency's ability to impose certain terms on state contracts.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Scraps Bond Order In Auto Plant Fight

    A group of Georgia residents hoping to block the construction of a $5 billion Rivian electric car plant shouldn't have been required to post a six-figure bond to continue with their litigation, a state Court of Appeals panel ruled Friday, overturning a county trial court's ruling.

  • February 02, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Donald Trump's Disqualification

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral arguments in a special session Thursday to consider former President Donald Trump's bid to be reinstated to the Colorado primary election ballot.

  • February 02, 2024

    GSA Lets Contractors Claim Rising Red Sea Shipping Costs

    The U.S. General Services Administration has authorized agencies participating in its employee relocation program to reimburse shipping companies the extra costs of rerouting household goods shipments to avoid Houthi attacks on the Red Sea.

  • February 02, 2024

    Infrastructure Co. Cuts Deal To Resolve DOL Equal Pay Probe

    An infrastructure consulting company has agreed to pay roughly $122,000 to shutter a U.S. Department of Labor investigation into allegations that the company paid women less than their male counterparts despite the workers having the same levels of experience and skill, the DOL said.

  • February 01, 2024

    GAO Nixes Protests To Army's Costly Pick For $549M Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office freed the U.S. Army Materiel Command from claims it unreasonably snubbed two contractors for an installation support deal in favor of a company with a more expensive bid, saying the command justified the price differential.

  • February 01, 2024

    GAO Backs Protest Over DHS Ignoring Change On $225M Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed Deloitte Consulting's protest over a $225.3 million U.S. Department of Homeland Security order for support services, saying DHS wrongly failed to take into account the awardee removing a proposed teaming partner from its bid.

Expert Analysis

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Bias, Unequal Discussions, Timeliness

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, James Tucker at MoFo offers takeaways from three bid protests in the U.S. Government Accountability Office relating to the high standard for protests that allege agency bias, seeking revised proposals from just one offeror, and untimely objections to solicitation terms.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • What New DHS Cybersecurity Policy Means For Bid Protests

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    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recently unveiled policy of factoring cybersecurity self-assessments into its overall evaluation of contractors could raise novel bid protest considerations for offerors in both the pre-award and post-award contexts, say Amy Hoang at Seyfarth and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Contracts Disputes Recap: Be Mindful Of Termination Clauses

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    Edward Arnold and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine three recent rulings — one from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and two from the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals — that highlight the termination clause as one of the most potent remedy-granting contract clauses.

  • 2 HHS Warnings Highlight Anti-Kickback Risks For Physicians

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    Two recent advisory opinions issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General involve different scenarios and rationales, but together they illustrate the OIG's focus on and disapproval of contractual joint ventures and other revenue-maximizing physician arrangements, say Robert Threlkeld and Elliott Coward at Morris Manning.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Best Practices For Defense Tech Startup Financing

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    Navigating the expanding and highly regulated defense technology sector requires careful planning and execution, starting at incorporation, so startups should prepare for foreign investor issues, choose their funding wisely and manage their funds carefully, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

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