Immigration

  • March 25, 2024

    Wash. Asks Judge To Undo Block Of ICE Detention Center Law

    Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has urged a federal judge to reconsider a recent ruling halting the state from conducting unannounced inspections and imposing new health and safety standards at an immigration detention facility, saying the decision "rests on legal error."

  • March 25, 2024

    Ill. Atty Fights To Keep Reinstatement Dispute In DC Court

    An Illinois attorney argued Monday that her lawsuit challenging the U.S. Department of Justice and its immigration component's refusal to reinstate her practice before federal immigration courts belongs in D.C. federal court, where the DOJ is based, not Virginia.

  • March 25, 2024

    DOJ Slammed For Backing GEO Group In Detainee Wage Fight

    A group of immigrant detainees has urged the Ninth Circuit to reject the federal government's stance that a privately run detention center in Tacoma is exempt from Washington's minimum wage, saying the United States has failed to point to any conflicting federal laws.

  • March 25, 2024

    Kamala Harris Touts Central American Economic Investments

    Vice President Kamala Harris announced Monday that the Partnership for Central America has drawn $5.2 billion in investments to boost economic opportunities and reduce migration from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, with $1 billion of that marking new private-sector funding.

  • March 25, 2024

    DOJ Calls Probe Of Alleged SpaceX Hiring Bias Constitutional

    The U.S. Department of Justice has defended its investigation into allegations that SpaceX refused to hire asylum-seekers and refugees, telling a Texas federal judge that its authority stems from a constitutionally sound provision of federal immigration law barring workplace discrimination based on citizenship status.

  • March 25, 2024

    Texas Judge Extends Stay On Border Wall Funding Order

    A Texas federal judge briefly extended a pause on an injunction directing the Biden administration to use funding Congress appropriated to build physical barriers on the Southwest border for that purpose, as the administration asks for clarification of the order, saying it could otherwise make it hard to build anything.

  • March 22, 2024

    Hostile Rancher Killed Migrant, Az. Prosecutors Tell Jury

    Arizona prosecutors went to trial Friday against a borderlands rancher they allege killed a migrant trespasser after a history of hostility toward border-crossers, while the man's counsel said he properly reported finding a dead body despite his deep fear that blame could be misdirected at him.

  • March 22, 2024

    Watchdog Calls To Redo $896M Migrant Transport Deal

    The U.S. General Services Administration must redo an $896 million contract to transport unaccompanied migrant children, after a federal watchdog determined that the deal was awarded to a company whose proposed contract lead may be unqualified to oversee the contract.

  • March 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Asylum Bid Over Burden Of Proof Error

    The Ninth Circuit revived an Indian man's asylum quest on Friday, saying an immigration appeals board mistakenly concluded that the U.S. government proved the man could safely relocate within India to avoid attacks by members of rival political parties.

  • March 22, 2024

    Floral Co. Pays Feds $2M To End Migrant Exploitation Action

    A Washington floral wreath and garland manufacturer will pay $1.9 million to close a U.S. Department of Labor probe into allegations that it underpaid and withheld safe housing and transportation from hundreds of temporary migrant workers.

  • March 22, 2024

    Judge Cuts ICE Contractor, Keeps US In Medical Abuse Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Friday left standing only a narrow sliver of class claims against the federal government from immigrant women alleging they underwent invasive, unnecessary medical procedures while in federal custody, dismissing the bulk of their lawsuit.

  • March 22, 2024

    Legal Scholar Rips Texas' 'Invasion' Defense Of Border Buoy

    A Cato Institute scholar warned the Fifth Circuit against accepting Texas' claim of a migrant "invasion" to justify installing buoys by the border, saying Friday that accepting the claim could also empower the federal government to arrest people with impunity.

  • March 22, 2024

    GOP States Can't Step Into Asylum Limits Suit, DC Judge Told

    The Biden administration and a group of asylum-seekers say Republican-led states can't intervene in their attempts to settle a lawsuit challenging asylum limits, with both parties saying the states had admitted that the administration adequately represented their interests.

  • March 22, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Case Against Man Held By ICE Despite Bail

    The Second Circuit said Friday a Brooklyn federal judge overstepped by tossing a case against a Dominican man who was detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after being granted bail in an illegal-reentry case, disagreeing with the judge's finding that the government was merely trying to thwart a court order.

  • March 21, 2024

    Texas Detention Sites Held Migrants Too Long, Report Says

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Office of Inspector General published the results Wednesday of unannounced inspections last year of six Customs and Border Protection short-term detention sites in Texas' Rio Grande Valley, finding that certain centers were overcapacity, detained immigrants longer than recommended and had multiple data integrity issues.

  • March 21, 2024

    Schumer Urges Texas District To Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday urged the chief judge of the Northern District of Texas to quickly implement the Judicial Conference of the United States' updated policy that looks to prevent litigants from judge shopping, arguing that the district's current practices are "dangerous."

  • March 21, 2024

    Mexico Slams Texas Migrant Law As State-Sanctioned Bias

    The government of Mexico denounced Texas' law empowering state officials to arrest and deport immigrants, telling the Fifth Circuit on Thursday that allowing the law to take effect would result in "state-sanctioned acts of bias" against its citizens. 

  • March 21, 2024

    Suit Fighting DC Law That Lets Noncitizens Vote Is Tossed

    The District of Columbia Board of Elections escaped a lawsuit accusing it of infringing U.S. citizens' right to vote by allowing certain noncitizens to vote in local elections after a federal judge ruled that the plaintiffs failed to show that they'd been harmed.

  • March 21, 2024

    Rock Quarry's H-2B Bid Fails Over Qualification Requirement

    The Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals has affirmed that a Texas rock quarry's application for 10 rock splitters and quarry workers through the temporary H-2B foreign worker program was rightfully denied because the company's six-month experience requirement wasn't justified.

  • March 21, 2024

    Bus Co. Will Halt Immigrant Transport To NY During Litigation

    Transportation company Roadrunner Charters will stop transporting immigrants from Texas to New York City during a lawsuit in which the city's Department of Social Services is trying to recoup $708 million for providing emergency services to the new arrivals.

  • March 21, 2024

    New Suit Aims To Block Immigration Fee Hikes

    The Biden administration is facing a new lawsuit over its controversial immigration fee increases for employers, with an immigrant investor, an investors' advocacy group and a technology trade group alleging the administration failed to adequately justify the fee hikes.

  • March 20, 2024

    Feds Say Conflict Zones Irrelevant To Diversity Visa Process

    The Biden administration countered a push from winners of the 2020 diversity visa lottery to speed up green card processing, telling a D.C. federal court that ongoing conflicts in the lottery winners' home countries — including Afghanistan, Ukraine and Sudan — have no bearing on their visa applications.

  • March 20, 2024

    Texas Struggles To Explain Arrest Law Specifics To 5th Circ.

    Texas was scant on details as Fifth Circuit judges questioned how it would enforce its law authorizing the arrest and removal of immigrants, while pushing Wednesday for at least parts of the statute to go into immediate effect.

  • March 20, 2024

    NC Printing Co. Settles DOJ Citizenship Discrimination Claim

    A North Carolina printing company has settled allegations leveled by the Justice Department that it unlawfully discriminated against a worker based on her citizenship status.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

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Expert Analysis

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Potential Outcomes After E Visa Processing Update

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    A recent update to the Foreign Affairs Manual’s E visa provisions may help ease consular backlogs, but a policy change that will require some applicants and their family members to process renewals overseas at different times creates new administrative burdens for practitioners, say Anna Morzy and Elizabeth Przybysz at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • New Fla. Immigration Law May Have Crippling Effects

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    Florida's new immigration law, which went into effect on July 1, will be especially burdensome in industries where retaining adequate staff is already an issue, so employers must assess their staff and thoroughly examine their employee records to check that all documentation is valid to avoid crippling fines and loss of licenses, says Trent Cotney at Adams and Reese.

  • A Blueprint For Addressing The Immigration Court Backlog

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    Since 2009, far more persons have been placed in removal proceedings than U.S. immigration courts could accommodate, but the government can reduce the 1.9 million-case backlog with steps that include reforming the court and the broader immigration system in a way that still prioritizes both due process and immigration enforcement, says Donald Kerwin at the Center for Migration Studies.

  • How Multiagency Sanctions Enforcement Alters Compliance

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    Recent indictments and guidance emphasizing scrutiny of third-party intermediaries make clear the government's increasingly interagency approach to sanctions enforcement and its view that financial institutions are the first line of defense against evasion efforts, particularly in connection with Russia's invasion of Ukraine, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • H-1B Registration System Is Broken But Not Beyond Repair

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    Recent U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services statistics confirm that the H-1B registration system, the primary path to U.S. employment for high-skilled foreign nationals, is in dire straits, but ongoing transparency, a willingness to seek input from stakeholders and thoughtful regulatory reforms could ensure its continued viability, say attorneys at Berry Appleman.

  • A Midyear Look At Expected Changes In Business Immigration

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    While legislative immigration reform remains a nonstarter this year, U.S. businesses and their advisers should keep an eye on agency-level regulatory efforts that are underway, which may bring significant changes to filing fees, employment verification, visa renewal processing and more, says Rami Fakhoury at Fakhoury Global.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

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