Immigration

  • April 24, 2024

    Ditching H-1Bs, Foreigners Hone Skills To Get Visas Faster

    U.S. employers and foreigners are increasingly chasing alternatives to the highly coveted but elusive H-1B visa — a turn of events that is leading immigrants to establish themselves as some of the most distinguished experts in their fields.

  • April 24, 2024

    World Cup Workers' Abuse Suit Still Falls Short, US Cos. Say

    A Texas engineering company and a Colorado subsidiary have asked a federal court to dismiss claims from Filipino workers alleging they were subjected to inhumane labor conditions when helping construct stadiums for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, arguing the workers' latest attempt doesn't even show the defendants recruited or hired them.

  • April 24, 2024

    Filipino Workers' $730K Trafficking Deal Gets Judge's Initial OK

    An Oklahoma federal court preliminarily approved a $730,000 settlement on Wednesday that would resolve Filipino workers' claims that a local couple tricked them into paying steep immigration and recruitment fees to come work for them in the U.S.

  • April 24, 2024

    Colombian Actor Says His Visa Denials Are Full Of Mistakes

    A Colombian actor with roles on Netflix and other channels and platforms has hauled U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services into Florida federal court, alleging USCIS made numerous mistakes when twice denying him an immigrant visa available to actors with extraordinary ability.

  • April 24, 2024

    Watchdog Says ICE Paid $25.3M For Empty Detention Space

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agreed to review its contract with private prison operator GEO Group Inc. in California after a federal watchdog found it paid $25.3 million for hundreds of unused beds.

  • April 23, 2024

    HHS Formalizes Flores Protections For Immigrating Minors

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will increase oversight of the treatment of children in immigration custody and fund the minors' legal costs, according to a final regulation released Tuesday that adopts congressional recommendations and the bedrock Flores agreement.

  • April 23, 2024

    10th Circ. Backs Mexican Woman's Appeal Of Asylum Denial

    The Tenth Circuit on Tuesday revived the asylum bid of a woman who based her fear of returning to Mexico on her cousin's murder, saying the woman had challenged an immigration judge's ruling properly before the Board of Immigration Appeals.

  • April 23, 2024

    Justices' Doubts May Undo 9th Circ. On Spousal Visa Rights

    The right wing of the U.S. Supreme Court appeared skeptical on Tuesday that a U.S. citizen can challenge her Salvadoran husband's visa denial, but seemed disinclined to rule that she has no constitutional rights in the process either.

  • April 23, 2024

    Judge Overturns Biz's H-2B Ban, Blaming 'Gaslighting' Atty

    A U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge overturned a decision to debar a Minnesota concessions stand company from the H-2B visa program over its failure to pay back wages and penalties, saying the small business's owner had only followed his attorney's advice — right into a legal disaster.

  • April 23, 2024

    Migrant-Hiring Crimes And Tax Evasion Get Pair Prison, $1.8M Fine

    A Florida federal judge has ordered two men to pay $1.8 million to the U.S. government and sentenced them to three years in prison after they confessed to recruiting migrants without employment authorization and failing to report workers' wages for tax purposes.

  • April 22, 2024

    Texas, Mo. Seek Full Vacatur Of DHS Border Wall Plan

    Texas and Missouri on Monday urged a Texas federal court to fully vacate the Biden administration's plans to redirect border wall construction funds, saying the plan adopted an overarching policy the court had declared was unlawful.

  • April 22, 2024

    Congress Urged To Fund Attys For Immigrants In Removal

    A coalition of more than 100 immigrant rights groups and several local governments urged congressional appropriators on Monday to allocate funds next fiscal year to increase legal representation for individuals in removal proceedings to protect their due process rights.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Reject Asylum Quest Of Man Caught In Transit Ban

    The U.S. Supreme Court turned down a Salvadoran man's petition to look at a Ninth Circuit decision that said the judiciary can't review expedited removal decisions from the executive branch, even though courts had found the Trump administration policy authorizing the man's removal to be unlawful.

  • April 22, 2024

    DC Judge Backs Feds' Power To Sanction Ex-Afghan Officials

    A D.C. federal judge shaved down a lawsuit challenging U.S. financial and immigration sanctions against two former Afghan lawmakers, stressing that the executive branch has sweeping authority to issue sanctions on individuals it finds to be corrupt.

  • April 22, 2024

    Immigration Orgs Fight Feds' Bid To Win Fee Hikes Dispute

    Nonprofit legal service providers fired back Friday against the federal government's bid to defeat the groups' lawsuit challenging Trump-era increases to immigration court fees, arguing that the government's final rule, which could raise certain fees by 700%, is arbitrary, capricious and unlawful.

  • April 19, 2024

    Feds Say Texas' Reliance On Justices In SB 4 Case Is Misplaced

    The U.S. Department of Justice told the Fifth Circuit on Friday that contrary to Texas' contention, two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions don't knock down a district court injunction stopping Texas officials from arresting and deporting migrants suspected of crossing the border without authorization.

  • April 19, 2024

    Wrongful Detention Suit Illustrates Pitfalls Of ICE Lockups

    A Salvadoran woman's recent lawsuit alleging immigration authorities locked her up for months despite her protected status highlights how authorized immigrants, and sometimes even U.S. citizens, can wind up being wrongfully detained, and how, with no right to counsel in immigration proceedings, it can prove difficult to free them.

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

  • April 19, 2024

    Fla. Can't Wage Real Estate War On Foreigners, 11th Circ. Told

    A group of Chinese citizens and a brokerage firm urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to block Florida from enforcing a law prohibiting certain foreign nationals from owning land while they challenge the statute's constitutionality, saying it's discriminatory and preempted by federal authority.

  • April 19, 2024

    Staffing Co. Can't Escape Bar On Task Order Protests

    A staffing firm can't escape the "gravitational field" of a rule restricting the U.S. Court of Federal Claims' authority to review task orders, a judge has said, ditching its challenge to being disqualified from orders reserved for women-owned small businesses.

  • April 18, 2024

    Texas Says Justices' Takings Decision Saves Its Arrest Law

    Texas has pointed the Fifth Circuit to a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, arguing that it supports the state's bid to undo a district court injunction blocking state officials from arresting and deporting immigrants suspected of crossing the border unlawfully.

  • April 18, 2024

    BNP Paribas Can't Escape Suit Over Sudan's Rights Abuses

    A New York federal judge on Thursday largely denied BNP Paribas SA's request for an early win in a lawsuit accusing it of funding the former Sudan government's human rights violations, saying the Sudanese refugee plaintiffs have pointed to a "multitude of proofs" showing the bank's "conscious assistance" and knowledge of Sudan' genocidal acts.

  • April 18, 2024

    Weather Data Dooms Co.'s H-2B Visa Bid For Warm Months

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge rejected a concrete company's efforts to hire seasonal workers from spring to fall, pointing out that its weather data undermined claims that it was seeking workers during warm-weather months favorable to concrete work.

  • April 18, 2024

    Feds Say Texas' Asylum Fight Must Go After La. Suit Got Axed

    The Biden administration told a Texas federal judge Wednesday that the Lone Star state's lawsuit challenging a Biden administration rule broadening immigration officers' power to expedite asylum applications must be tossed in light of a recent decision in Louisiana throwing out nearly identical claims lodged by 19 Republican-led states.

  • April 18, 2024

    DHS Watchdog Finds Use Of Force Issues In Fla. ICE Facility

    Officers at a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facility in Miami used inappropriate force on detainees, including pepper-spraying a harmless and isolated individual through a slot in a cell door, according to a government watchdog report.

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Expert Analysis

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • How Int'l Student-Athlete Law Would Change The NIL Game

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    Recently proposed legislation to allow international student-athletes the opportunity to profit from their name, image and likeness without violating their F-1 nonimmigrant student visa status represents a pivotal step in NIL policy, and universities must assess and adapt their approaches to accommodate unique immigration concerns, say attorneys at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Expect CFPB Flex Over Large Nonbank Payment Cos.

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    A recent enforcement action and a new rule proposal from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicate a growing focus on the nonbank payment ecosystem, especially larger participants, in 2024, say Felix Shipkevich and Jessica Livingston at Shipkevich.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • What New DHS Cybersecurity Policy Means For Bid Protests

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    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recently unveiled policy of factoring cybersecurity self-assessments into its overall evaluation of contractors could raise novel bid protest considerations for offerors in both the pre-award and post-award contexts, say Amy Hoang at Seyfarth and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

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