Intellectual Property

  • April 02, 2024

    Podcast Agrees To Ax AI-Generated George Carlin Special

    The makers of Dudesy, a comedy podcast created and written by artificial intelligence, have agreed to take down a fake comedy special that "resurrected" George Carlin and to refrain from using the late comedian's image, voice and likeness without permission, Carlin's estate told a California federal judge Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    USPTO Stands By Proposal To Increase Many Patent Fees

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office released a proposal Tuesday to increase many patent-related fees beginning next year, standing by planned hikes related to requesting continued examination, design patents and post-grant challenges that have drawn concern.

  • April 02, 2024

    'This Just Has To Stop': Judge Hits Hytera With $1M Daily Fine

    An Illinois federal judge imposed a daily $1 million fine and other steep contempt sanctions against Hytera Communications on Tuesday, as she ripped the company for violating her order to refrain from participating in Chinese litigation that could undermine Motorola Solutions' $530 million mobile radio trade secrets trial win.

  • April 02, 2024

    Judge Notes There's No 'Jump To Conclusions' Mat In His Court

    In throwing out a lawsuit against a luxury car brand, a Delaware federal judge likened an expert report proffered by a patent litigation outfit to the absurd "Jump To Conclusions" mat from the 1999 movie "Office Space."

  • April 02, 2024

    Lupin Scores Win In Rosacea Patent Fight With Galderma

    A judge has found that Galderma failed on its allegations that Lupin infringed a pair of its patents that cover a rosacea drug, saying "Galderma has a theory but no proof."

  • April 02, 2024

    Frat That Allows Women Barred From Using 'Sigma Phi' Name

    A federal judge in Detroit says that a University of Michigan fraternity is breaking the law by continuing to use the Sigma Phi name after the national fraternity excommunicated the group for accepting women.

  • April 02, 2024

    Calif. IP Owners Can't Intervene In NY Case, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge has refused to let copyright holders who have sued in California into litigation in the Empire State accusing OpenAI and Microsoft of copyright infringement.

  • April 02, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Seems Ready To Revive Amarin's Skinny Label Suit

    A Federal Circuit panel seemed wary Tuesday of a Delaware federal judge's decision to throw out Amarin Pharma Inc.'s infringement suit over Hikma Pharmaceuticals USA Inc.'s limited-use version of the blockbuster cardiovascular drug Vascepa, suggesting the district court may have been too hasty.

  • April 02, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Questions Attorney's Fee Award In Dish Patent Case

    A Federal Circuit judge questioned a district court decision to award $3.9 million in attorney fees to Dish Network in its successful patent suit defense against Realtime Adaptive Streaming, picking apart a series of "red flags" that U.S. District Judge R. Brooke Jackson said should have prompted Realtime to drop its case well before summary judgment.

  • April 02, 2024

    USPTO Targeted In Brothers' Patent Litigation Campaign

    Two brothers who are software engineers and claim to have invented two-factor authorization are accusing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office of infringing their patents with its sign-in website.

  • April 02, 2024

    Samsung, Micron Notch PTAB Wins On Netlist Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board decided Monday that two Netlist computer memory patents are invalid, in a win for Samsung, which was previously found to infringe the patents in a $303 million Texas verdict, and Micron, whose infringement trial was postponed to await the rulings.

  • April 02, 2024

    BigLaw Recruiter's Bid To Ditch $6M Ruling Fails At 5th Circ.

    A BigLaw recruiter is on the hook for more than $6 million for stealing trade secrets and breaking a noncompete agreement with his former employer after the Fifth Circuit ruled client details taken by the recruiter were confidential information.

  • April 02, 2024

    Daiichi Gets Award Nixing Seagen Cancer Drug Claims OK'd

    A Washington federal judge has refused to revive U.S. biotech company Seagen Inc.'s claims seeking billions of dollars in damages in a dispute with Japanese drugmaker Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd. over cancer drug patents, ruling that an arbitrator who tossed the claims did not disregard the law.

  • April 02, 2024

    Fanatics Exec To Take Stand In DraftKings Noncompete Suit

    A Boston federal judge said Tuesday she expects a former DraftKings executive to testify later this month in a hearing to sort out competing narratives and allegations of corporate espionage related to his abrupt departure to work for rival sportsbook Fanatics.

  • April 02, 2024

    Qualcomm Says 9th Circ. Panel Already Heard Chip Claims

    Qualcomm is urging the Ninth Circuit to assign an appeal from phone and tablet buyers looking to revive allegations that the chipmaker uses anti-competitive licensing practices to the same panel that nixed a class certification ruling in the long-running case.

  • April 02, 2024

    BCLP Joins Forces With Trial Lawyer Boutique In Seattle

    Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP announced Tuesday it has combined with a litigation group of 12 lawyers who formerly practiced together as Harrigan Leyh Farmer & Thomsen LLP in Seattle.

  • April 01, 2024

    Pharrell's Neptunes Partner Says Hitmaker Committed Fraud

    Pharrell Williams has claimed sole ownership of the name the Neptunes, a move that lawyers for the pop sensation's producing partner said was fraud and led them to file a legal action at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

  • April 01, 2024

    L'Oreal Wins Toss Of Trade Secret Suit Over Misconduct

    A California federal judge tossed long-running trade secrets litigation against L'Oreal on Friday, saying that a hair coloring startup's misconduct in the case "casts doubt on the veracity and integrity of all evidence" and that axing the suit altogether is the "only appropriate sanction."

  • April 01, 2024

    Split 9th Circ. Says Court Can Void Pot Co.'s TM Applications

    A Ninth Circuit majority affirmed on Monday the cancellation of cannabis grower Central Coast Agriculture's trademark applications for its "Raw Garden" brand due to its lack of bona fide intent to use the marks commercially, with one judge dissenting, saying district courts can't interfere with and prematurely cancel trademark applications.

  • April 01, 2024

    Alien IP Suit Against New Age Video Co. Gaia Falls To Earth

    A Colorado federal judge has dismissed nearly all of a lawsuit from a UFO community influencer against yoga and New Age content website Gaia Inc., finding most of his claims were too vague.

  • April 01, 2024

    Apple, Intel Again Lose Fintiv APA Challenge In Calif. Court

    A California federal judge on Sunday ended Big Tech's coordinated challenge to Patent Trial and Appeal Board precedent that allows its judges to discretionarily deny patent reviews based on how proposed reviews overlap with related litigation in other forums.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Challenges To J&J Schizophrenia Drug

    A Federal Circuit panel on Monday gave generics-makers Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. and Viatris Inc. a new chance to prove that a patent on Johnson & Johnson's blockbuster schizophrenia drug Invega Sustenna is invalid, saying a lower court used an "erroneously rigid" analysis when rejecting their challenge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Pool Co. Seeks $4.36M In Atty Fees After False Ad Verdict

    Attorneys from McCarter & English LLP and Womble Bond Dickinson LLP are seeking more than $4 million in fees following a multimillion-dollar verdict in a North Carolina false advertising and unfair business practices suit involving rival pool supply companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Sports Illustrated Hits 'Gangster' Ex-Publisher With IP Suit

    The owner of Sports Illustrated alleges in a $49 million lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan federal court that an energy drink mogul acted like a "gangster" when he became the magazine's publisher, tearing apart a long-standing licensing agreement while sabotaging the brand and holding hostage valuable intellectual property.

  • April 01, 2024

    Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Faces TM Suit Over Health Products

    Oregon-based Good Clean Love Inc. sued Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Inc. for trademark infringement over its good.clean.goop women's health products, alleging that the rival's branding is threatening Good Clean Love's reputation and goodwill by sowing customer confusion.

Expert Analysis

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

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    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Expediting Psychedelics Approvals In The EU, UK, Australia

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    Accelerated pathways for regulatory approvals for psychedelic drugs in the European Union, U.K. and Australia is indispensable to facilitate a seamless advancement of treatments from the research environment to the consumer, say Kimberly Chew at Husch Blackwell, and Ana Dukic and Sabrina Ramkellawan at AxialBridge.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Opinion

    Vidal Should Amend USPTO Precedent In Automaker Review

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    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal's recent decision to review Ford and Honda patent challenges that were rejected by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board provides an opportunity to revisit precedents that have unfairly denied companies a fair review process and align them with commonsense principles of legal equity, says former Sen. Patrick Leahy.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Considering A Practical FRAND Rate Assessment Procedure

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    As the debate over a fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory rate continues inside and outside courtrooms, a practical method may assess whether the proposed FRAND rate deviates significantly from what is reasonable, and ensure an optimal mix of assets for managers of standard-essential patent portfolios, says consultant Gordon Huang.

  • How AI Inventorship Is Evolving In The UK, EU And US

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    While the U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision in Thaler v. Comptroller-General is the latest in a series of decisions by U.K., U.S. and EU authorities that artificial intelligence systems cannot be named as inventors in patents, the guidance from these jurisdictions suggests that patents may be granted to human inventors that use AI as a sophisticated tool, say lawyers at Mayer Brown.

  • How Biotech Cos. Can Utilize Synthetic Royalty Financing

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    Synthetic royalty transactions have been on the rise as a funding structure for biotechnology companies, but questions have arisen surrounding how such transactions work, and structuring them correctly requires a nuanced understanding, say Todd Trattner and Ryan Murr at Gibson Dunn.

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