Courts

  • Netflix Libel Trial To Feature Full Central Park 5 Series

    Jurors will watch Netflix's entire four-part dramatization of the Central Park Five rape case and exoneration before deciding whether the series defamed a longtime top prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday ahead of the trial.

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    Trump's Late Immunity Motion Fails To Halt Hush Money Trial

    A New York judge on Wednesday rejected Donald Trump's effort to delay his hush money trial based on his claimed presidential immunity from criminal prosecution, keeping the historic case on track for jury selection later this month.

  • White House Refuses To Call For Justice Sotomayor To Retire

    White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Wednesday that any decision by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to retire is a personal choice for her alone to make, amid calls for the 69-year-old liberal justice to step down while President Joe Biden is in office and able to nominate her replacement.

  • Judge Wary Of Atty's Bid To Cut Sentence For Hiding Assets

    A Seventh Circuit judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of an Illinois lawyer's contention that she should not have received an abuse-of-trust sentencing enhancement for helping her brother conceal more than $350,000 in bankruptcy assets, noting she deposited them in her attorney trust account and attempted to assert attorney-client privilege to hide her conduct from the trustee.

  • Sen. Durbin Urged To Pass Legislation To Curb Judge Shopping

    A coalition of more than 20 organizations have called on Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, to curtail the use of judge shopping through legislation and oversight because they believe more is needed beyond the Judicial Conference of the United States' latest action to curb "right wing" influence over the courts. 

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    Beloved Georgia Judge Writes His Own Obituary

    Senior U.S. District Judge Hugh Lawson Jr., a revered Georgia jurist known for his humor and lack of pretense, died Friday at 82, leaving behind an obituary in which he described himself as a religious man whose "last conscious thought" would be his wife's name and who considered all his children to be his "favorite."

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    Ex-Prosecutor Joins Manatt From BakerHostetler In San Diego

    An ex-federal prosecutor has moved his litigation practice from BakerHostetler to Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP's recently opened Southern California office to reunite with a former colleague from the U.S. Attorney's Office.

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    Trump Ally Brings Ethics Query Over Judge's CNN Interview

    An ally of Donald Trump has raised ethics concerns about a senior D.C. federal judge, complaining that the judge's statements on CNN about the former president's statements about the judiciary was "highly prejudicial" toward Trump's four pending criminal cases.

  • Ex-Saul Ewing Paralegal Gets 2 Years For $600K Fraud

    An Illinois federal judge sentenced a former Saul Ewing LLP paralegal to two years in prison for embezzling more than $600,000 from the firm's bankruptcy practice over nine years, which she used to make mortgage payments, buy a car and partially fund her son's college education.

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    Task Force Releases New AI Guidance For Courts

    The National Center for State Courts' artificial intelligence rapid response team has released more interim guidance on how courts can start experimenting with AI and what they should consider about platforms using the technology, the center said Wednesday.

  • Oil Company Says Judge's Recusal Not Needed In Cartel Suits

    Pioneer Natural Resources Co. fired back at gasoline buyers' attempt to recuse a Nevada federal judge from the parties' antitrust litigation over her stock ownership in ExxonMobil Corp., arguing that the company isn't a party to the case, and that the litigation should be transferred to Texas.

  • Judge's Recusal Not Needed In Indiana Hospital Fall Suit

    An Indiana appeals panel rejected a woman's bid to revive her suit over a trip and fall injury she suffered while taking her grandson to a hospital in Hobart, saying the fact the judge's son worked for the hospital's law firm does not show there was a conflict requiring the judge's recusal.

  • Special Counsel Tells Judge Cannon To Rule On PRA Issue

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate told U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon that she needs to rule on Trump's argument that he was authorized under the Presidential Records Act to take the documents and cannot send the question of law to the jury.

  • Trump Wants New Bite At Recusal Over Judge's Daughter

    Donald Trump is again seeking the recusal of the judge overseeing his Manhattan criminal case, saying the judge's daughter and her political consulting firm stand to financially benefit from the case, while prosecutors argued Trump's "daisy chain of innuendos" isn't evidence that the judge, or his daughter, will gain anything.

  • Backlash To 3rd Circ. Nom Could Hamper More Muslim Picks

    Only two Muslims serve on the federal bench, well below the prevalence of people practicing the faith within the U.S., and the recent travails of a third picked to serve on the court might bode ill for adding more.

  • Ex-NY Court Atty Says DA Has No Evidence Of Corruption

    A former appeals court attorney told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that the district attorney can't back up charges that she intended to benefit her husband when she gave a "basic, procedural fact" about the status of a case to his client.

  • Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

  • 11th Circ. Sends OpenAI Fee Fight Back To District Court

    The Eleventh Circuit vacated a Georgia federal judge's decision not to dock OpenAI attorney fees for attempting to remove a Georgia radio host's defamation suit to federal court, saying the judge should have but did not adequately explain the reasons for the denial.

  • Prosecutors Call Indicted Exec's Misconduct Claims 'Flawed'

    Prosecutors have asked a California federal judge to reject a bid for sanctions by a former healthcare CEO indicted on novel insider trading charges, arguing that his claims related to a separate case are based on "flawed grounds."

  • Wash. Can Use New Elections Map Despite Partisan Criticism

    Washington state can implement a new, court-approved legislative district map aimed at resolving Hispanic voter dilution claims, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, rejecting a bid from three Republican Latino voters to pause the map's adoption while they challenge it for improperly favoring Democratic candidates.

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    Boston Bomber Case Offers Clues For Trump Jury Selection

    A recent ruling that may undo the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence holds lessons for Donald Trump's upcoming trials, where attorneys will need to make prospective jurors comfortable enough to admit bias before they're picked — and potentially avoid years of appellate fights.

  • 100-Plus Groups Rally Behind Adeel Mangi For 3rd Circ.

    Over 100 federal and state advocacy groups sent a letter to senators on Tuesday urging them to support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed, amid increasing opposition to him.

  • Man Gets 14 Months For Threatening To Kill Justice Roberts

    A Florida man who admitted to calling U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts' chambers and leaving a voicemail in which he twice threatened to kill the justice has been sentenced to 14 months in federal prison. 

  • Trump's Gag Order Expands Over 'Attacks' On Judge's Family

    Donald Trump has a constitutional right to respond to alleged political attacks, but he does not have a right to attack family members of the state judge overseeing his criminal case in New York, the judge ruled late Monday, expanding the former president's gag order in his hush money case.

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Off The Bench

    A three-member panel of Georgia's Judicial Qualifications Commission has recommended a Douglas County probate judge be removed from the bench following accusations that she violated the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailed a woman seeking to amend her marriage record.

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Expert Analysis

  • Future Lawyers Expect DEI Commitments Beyond Recruiting Author Photo

    To attract future lawyers from diverse backgrounds, firms must think beyond recruiting efforts, because law students are looking for diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives that invest in employee professional development and engage with students year-round, says Lauren Jackson at Howard University School of Law.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Law Students Build Real-World Skills? Author Photo

    Allison Coffin at Akin Gump discusses how summer associates going back to school can continue to develop real-world lawyering skills by leveraging the numerous law school resources that support professional development both inside and outside the classroom.

  • How Firm Leaders Can Build And Sustain Culture Author Photo

    In uncertain and challenging times, law firm leaders can build and sustain culture by focusing attention on mission, values and leadership development, and applying a growth mindset across their firms, says Scott Westfahl at Harvard Law.

  • The Case That Showed Me The Value Of E-Discovery Plans Author Photo

    Robert Keeling at Sidley reflects on leading discovery in the litigation that followed the historic $85 billion AT&T-Time Warner merger and how the case highlighted the importance of having a strategic e-discovery plan in place.

  • Opinion

    CLE Accreditation Should Be Tied To Learning Outcomes Author Photo

    Given the substantial time and money lawyers put toward mandatory continuing legal education, CLE regulators and providers should be held to accreditation standards that assess learning outcomes, similar to those imposed on law schools and continuing medical education providers, says Rima Sirota at Georgetown Law.

  • Why You Should Leverage AI For Privilege Review Author Photo

    While many lawyers still believe that a manual, document-by-document review is the best approach to privilege logging, certain artificial intelligence tools can bolster the traditional review process and make this aspect of electronic document review more efficient, more accurate and less costly, say Laura Riff and Michelle Six at Kirkland.

  • Persuading The Court With Visual Aids In Written Argument Author Photo

    Robert Dubose at Alexander Dubose describes several categories of visuals attorneys can use to make written arguments easier to understand or more persuasive, and provides tips for lawyers unused to working with anything but text.

  • BigLaw Vs. Mid-Law Summer Programs: The Pros And Cons Author Photo

    There are major differences between BigLaw and Mid-Law summer associate programs, and each approach can learn something from the other in terms of structure and scheduling, the on-the-job learning opportunities provided, and the social experiences offered, says Anna Tison at Brooks Pierce.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Take Time Off? Author Photo

    David Kouba at Arnold & Porter discusses how attorneys can prioritize mental health leave and vacation despite work-related barriers to taking time off.

  • Law Firms Must Prioritize Mental Health In Internal Comms Author Photo

    The traditional structure of law firms, with their compartmentalization into silos, is an inherent challenge to mental wellness, so partners and senior lawyers should take steps to construct and disseminate internal action plans and encourage open dialogue, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Our Current Approach To Trial Advocacy Training Is Lacking Author Photo

    The key to trial advocacy is persuasion, but current training programs focus almost entirely on technique, making it imperative that lawyers are taught to be effective storytellers and to connect with their audiences, says Chris Arledge at Ellis George.

  • How Women In Law Can Advance Toward Leadership Roles Author Photo

    Female attorneys in leadership roles inspire other women to pursue similar opportunities in a male-dominated field, and for those who aspire to lead, prioritizing collaboration, inclusivity and integrity is key, says Kim Yelkin at Foley & Lardner.

  • The Case That Took Me From Prosecutor To Defense Attorney Author Photo

    Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Moira Penza, now at Wilkinson Stekloff, recalls the challenges of her first case as a civil defense attorney — a multibillion-dollar multidistrict class action against Allergan — and the lessons she learned about building rapport in the courtroom and with co-counsel.

  • The Importance Of Legal Macroeconomics Education For Attys Author Photo

    Most legal professionals lack understanding of the macroeconomic trends unique to the legal industry, like the rising cost of law school and legal services, which contributes to an unfair and inaccessible justice system, so law school courses and continuing legal education requirements in this area are essential, says Bob Glaves at the Chicago Bar Foundation.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Hold DC Judges Accountable For Misconduct Author Photo

    On the heels of Thursday's congressional hearing on workplace protections for judiciary employees, former law clerk Aliza Shatzman recounts her experience of harassment by a D.C. Superior Court judge — and argues that the proposed Judiciary Accountability Act, which would extend vital anti-discrimination protections to federal court employees, should also include D.C. courts.

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