Courts

  • Nat'l Security Info Ordered Sealed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has ordered protocols to seal confidential State Department materials amid the government's criminal fraud case charging a Maryland lawyer with misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets.

  • 4E Can Give Recovered Jackson Walker Fees To Creditors

    The agent administering the confirmed plan of bankrupt hand-sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC received permission Monday from a Texas judge to modify that plan, allowing the agent to distribute fees clawed back from embattled law firm Jackson Walker LLP to the debtor's unsecured creditors.

  • Mich. Can't Get Immunity In Courthouse ADA Class Action

    Attorneys with disabilities and a disability rights advocate can proceed with a proposed class action aimed at forcing accessibility improvements at several Michigan courthouses and government buildings, a Michigan federal judge ruled Saturday, rejecting the state's argument that it was immune from the suit.  

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    Murdaugh Gets 40 Years For Financial Crimes In Fed. Court

    Alex Murdaugh, the disgraced former South Carolina lawyer serving a life sentence for murder, was hit with a concurrent 40-year prison term in federal court Monday after pleading guilty to stealing at least $9 million from clients.

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    Schumer Warns Texas Court Not To Continue Judge Shopping

    The U.S. Senate will consider legislation to curtail judge shopping after the Northern District of Texas' chief judge rejected calls for the district to take steps to end the "odious" practice on its own, the Senate leader said Monday.

  • NJ Courts Get Out Of Suit Alleging Ex-Judge Harassed Official

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts has gotten out of a lawsuit from a municipal court administrator alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge, arguing that the woman was never an employee of the office.

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    Cooper University Health Names Ex-Judge As 1st Legal Chief

    Just over six months after retiring from the bench and joining Chiesa Shahinian & Giantomasi PC, a former New Jersey federal judge will become the first chief legal officer for South Jersey health system Cooper University Health Care.

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    DOJ Antitrust Enforcement Vets Jump To Skadden, Foley

    Two veterans of the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division have headed to private practice in Washington, D.C., with one joining Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP and another leaving the government for Foley & Lardner LLP, the firms said Monday.

  • Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Jailed Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Witness Tampering In Tax Case

    A Chicago-area lawyer facing more than a dozen criminal tax fraud charges pled not guilty Monday to superseding charges that he tried scripting a bookkeeper's anticipated testimony, but he'll have to wait to learn whether he'll remain jailed until his upcoming retrial.

  • Justices Won't Hear Atty's Bid To Conflict Out Entire Ill. Bench

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the case of a lawyer suspended in Illinois who claimed the state's entire federal judiciary needed to recuse itself from his challenge to Illinois' attorney watchdog.

  • Petition Watch: Off-Label Ads, Retiree Discrimination & PPE

    A Utah attorney has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether allegedly retaliatory IRS summonses can be quashed, and two former pharmaceutical executives are challenging the constitutionality of their convictions for marketing the off-label use of a drug. Here, Law360 looks at recently filed petitions that you might've missed.

  • Manhattan DA Says Trump Violated Hush Money Gag Order

    Donald Trump may have already violated a New York state judge's gag order in the former president's hush money case by impugning the judge's daughter on social media, Manhattan prosecutors said, while Trump's attorneys say prosecutors are trying to improperly expand the order.

  • Northern Texas Judges Won't Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Judges with the Northern District of Texas have opted not to make any changes to how cases are assigned, despite a recent letter from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer urging the district to implement an updated policy aiming to prevent litigants from judge shopping, the district's chief judge said Friday.

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    Las Vegas Sands' Global GC Sees Comp Top $12M In '23

    Las Vegas Sands' global general counsel, who earlier in his career clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts and then-U.S. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh, earned more than $12 million in total compensation in 2023, a big jump from the roughly $2.6 million the previous year, according to a securities filing Friday.

  • Up Next After Bankman-Fried Sentencing: FTX Cooperators

    Now that FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for an $11 billion fraud on the collapsed crypto exchange, it's time for the three top lieutenants who testified against him at trial to face their own judgments — and experts say the cooperators are well positioned to avoid jail time.

  • 2nd Circ. Revives Conn. Atty's Suit Over Gun Ban In Parks

    The Second Circuit has revived the lawsuit of a Connecticut attorney challenging the state's ban on firearms in state parks, finding that the state did not meet its burden to show it didn't intend to enforce the law.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in five cases this week, including a highly anticipated one over the fate of medication abortions, and another over when repeat offenders qualify to have their sentences enhanced. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

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    'Rust' Movie Armorer Denied New Trial, Remains Jailed

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday rejected "Rust" armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed's emergency motion to be released from custody and given a new trial based on what her attorneys argued were erroneous jury instructions leading to her conviction over the on-set shooting death of a cinematographer.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    The end of March marked another busy week for the legal industry as BigLaw made notable hires and shifted office locations. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

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    Catching Up With Former NC Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

    It's been more than three years since former North Carolina Supreme Court Justice Cheri Beasley left the bench, accelerating her return to private practice and paving the way for a contested U.S. congressional campaign.

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    Ga. Bill Aims To Protect Judges Even As Security Gap Lingers

    Georgia is poised to join the federal government and a growing number of states in seeking to protect judges with a new legislative proposal that would restrict the disclosure of their personal information, though supporters acknowledge it shouldn't stand alone as a security measure.

  • Munger Tolles, Stroock Alums Tapped For Calif. Judiciary

    Among California Gov. Gavin Newsom's picks for judgeships around the Golden State are a former Munger Tolles & Olson LLP attorney, who will serve on the state's Second District Court of Appeal, and a Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP alumna.

  • Sen. Menendez Won't Delay May 6 Trial As He Forgoes Appeal

    Sen. Robert Menendez told a New York federal judge Thursday he won't seek interlocutory appeal of his order two weeks ago rejecting the lawmaker's bid to dismiss his bribery case based on the speech and debate clause of U.S. Constitution, teeing up his jury trial set for May 6.

  • Feds Say Ex-OneCoin Atty Should Serve 'Substantial' Time

    Manhattan federal prosecutors have requested a "substantial" amount of prison time for a Bulgarian woman who worked on the legal team at the fraudulent OneCoin cryptocurrency exchange, but said the sentence should fall below the guidelines range of 10 years.

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Expert Analysis

  • What ABA Student Well-Being Standards Mean For Law Firms Author Photo

    While the American Bar Association's recent amendments to its law school accreditation standards around student well-being could have gone further, legal industry employers have much to learn from the ABA's move and the well-being movement that continues to gain traction in law schools, says David Jaffe at the American University Washington College of Law.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Build Rapport In New In-House Role? Author Photo

    Tim Parilla at LinkSquares explains how new in-house lawyers can start developing relationships with colleagues both within and outside their legal departments in order to expand their networks, build their brands and carve their paths to leadership positions.

  • What Attys Should Consider Before Taking On Pro Bono Work
    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Piper Hoffman and Will Lowrey at Animal Outlook lay out suggestions for attorneys to maximize the value of their pro bono efforts, from crafting engagement letters to balancing workloads — and they explain how these principles can foster a more rewarding engagement for both lawyers and nonprofits.

  • Opinion

    NY Bar Admission Criminal History Query Is Unjust, Illegal Author Photo

    New York should revise Question 26 on its bar admission application, because requiring students to disclose any prior interaction with the criminal justice system disproportionately affects people of color, who have a history of being overpoliced — and it violates several state laws, says Andrew Brown, president of the New York State Bar Association.

  • 7 Ways Attys Can Improve Their LinkedIn Summaries Author Photo

    Lawyers can use LinkedIn to strengthen their thought leadership position, generate new business, explore career opportunities, and better position themselves and their firms in search results by writing a well-composed, optimized summary that demonstrates their knowledge and experience, says Guy Alvarez at Good2bSocial.

  • How Law Firms And Attys Can Combat Imposter Syndrome Author Photo

    Imposter syndrome is rampant in the legal profession, especially among lawyers from underrepresented backgrounds, leading to missed opportunities and mental health issues — but firms can provide support in numerous ways, and attorneys can use therapeutic strategies to quiet their inner critic, says Helen Pamely at Rosling King.

  • The Law Firm Qualities Partners Seek In Lateral Moves Author Photo

    In 2022, partners considering lateral moves have new priorities, and firms that hope to recruit top talent will need to communicate their strategy for growth, engage on hot issues like origination credit and diversity initiatives, and tailor their integration plans toward expanding partners’ client base, says Gloria Sandrino at Lateral Link.

  • Small Steps Can Help Employers Beat Attorney Burnout Author Photo

    Lawyers are experiencing burnout on a massive, unprecedented scale due to the pandemic, but law firms and institutional players can and should make a difference by focusing on small, practical solutions that protect their attorneys’ most precious personal resource and professional commodity — time, says Chad Sarchio, president of the District of Columbia Bar.

  • The Evolving Role Of The Law Firm Legal Secretary Author Photo

    Technological shifts during the pandemic and beyond should force firms to rethink how legal secretaries can not only better support timekeepers but also participate in elevating client service, bifurcating the role into an administrative support position and a more elevated practice support role, says Lauren Chung at HBR Consulting.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Ace My Upcoming Annual Review? Author Photo

    Jennifer Rakstad at White & Case highlights how associates can emphasize achievements and seek support before, during and after their annual review, despite the pandemic’s negative effects on face time with colleagues and business development opportunities.

  • How Your Law Firm's Brand Can Convey Prestige Author Photo

    In order to be perceived as prestigious by clients and potential recruits, law firms should take their branding efforts beyond designing visual identities and address six key imperatives to differentiate themselves — from identifying intangible core strengths to delivering on promises at every interaction, says Howard Breindel at DeSantis Breindel.

  • How Dynamic Project Management Can Help Law Firms Author Photo

    Law firms looking to streamline matter management should consider tools that offer both employees and clients real-time access to documents, action items, task assignee information and more, overcoming many of the limitations of project communications via email, says Stephen Weyer at Stites & Harbison.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Successfully Switch Practices? Author Photo

    Associates who pivot into new practice areas may find that along with the excitement of a fresh start comes some apprehension, but certain proactive steps can help tame anxiety and ensure attorneys successfully adapt to unfamiliar subjects, novel internal processes and different client deliverables, say Susan Berson and Hassan Shaikh at Mintz.

  • A Road Map For Creating Law Firm Sustainability Programs Author Photo

    Amid demands from clients and prospective hires for greater sustainability efforts, law firms should think beyond reusable mugs and create programs that incorporate clear leadership structures, emission tracking and reduction goals, and frameworks for reporting results, says Gayatri Joshi at the Law Firm Sustainability Network.

  • Why Firms Should Help Associates Do More Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    Associates may hesitate to take on the added commitment of pro bono matters, but such work has tangible skill-building benefits, so firms should consider compensation and leadership strategies to encourage participation, says Rasmeet Chahil at Lowenstein Sandler.

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