Courts

  • Special Counsel Tells Judge Cannon To Rule On PRA Issue

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate told U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon that she needs to rule on Trump's argument that he was authorized under the Presidential Records Act to take the documents and cannot send the question of law to the jury.

  • Trump Wants New Bite At Recusal Over Judge's Daughter

    Donald Trump is again seeking the recusal of the judge overseeing his Manhattan criminal case, saying the judge's daughter and her political consulting firm stand to financially benefit from the case, while prosecutors argued Trump's "daisy chain of innuendos" isn't evidence that the judge, or his daughter, will gain anything.

  • Backlash To 3rd Circ. Nom Could Hamper More Muslim Picks

    Only two Muslims serve on the federal bench, well below the prevalence of people practicing the faith within the U.S., and the recent travails of a third picked to serve on the court might bode ill for adding more.

  • Ex-NY Court Atty Says DA Has No Evidence Of Corruption

    A former appeals court attorney told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that the district attorney can't back up charges that she intended to benefit her husband when she gave a "basic, procedural fact" about the status of a case to his client.

  • Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

  • 11th Circ. Sends OpenAI Fee Fight Back To District Court

    The Eleventh Circuit vacated a Georgia federal judge's decision not to dock OpenAI attorney fees for attempting to remove a Georgia radio host's defamation suit to federal court, saying the judge should have but did not adequately explain the reasons for the denial.

  • Prosecutors Call Indicted Exec's Misconduct Claims 'Flawed'

    Prosecutors have asked a California federal judge to reject a bid for sanctions by a former healthcare CEO indicted on novel insider trading charges, arguing that his claims related to a separate case are based on "flawed grounds."

  • Wash. Can Use New Elections Map Despite Partisan Criticism

    Washington state can implement a new, court-approved legislative district map aimed at resolving Hispanic voter dilution claims, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, rejecting a bid from three Republican Latino voters to pause the map's adoption while they challenge it for improperly favoring Democratic candidates.

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    Boston Bomber Case Offers Clues For Trump Jury Selection

    A recent ruling that may undo the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence holds lessons for Donald Trump's upcoming trials, where attorneys will need to make prospective jurors comfortable enough to admit bias before they're picked — and potentially avoid years of appellate fights.

  • 100-Plus Groups Rally Behind Adeel Mangi For 3rd Circ.

    Over 100 federal and state advocacy groups sent a letter to senators on Tuesday urging them to support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed, amid increasing opposition to him.

  • Man Gets 14 Months For Threatening To Kill Justice Roberts

    A Florida man who admitted to calling U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts' chambers and leaving a voicemail in which he twice threatened to kill the justice has been sentenced to 14 months in federal prison. 

  • Trump's Gag Order Expands Over 'Attacks' On Judge's Family

    Donald Trump has a constitutional right to respond to alleged political attacks, but he does not have a right to attack family members of the state judge overseeing his criminal case in New York, the judge ruled late Monday, expanding the former president's gag order in his hush money case.

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Off The Bench

    A three-member panel of Georgia's Judicial Qualifications Commission has recommended a Douglas County probate judge be removed from the bench following accusations that she violated the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailed a woman seeking to amend her marriage record.

  • Nat'l Security Info Ordered Sealed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has ordered protocols to seal confidential State Department materials amid the government's criminal fraud case charging a Maryland lawyer with misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets.

  • 4E Can Give Recovered Jackson Walker Fees To Creditors

    The agent administering the confirmed plan of bankrupt hand-sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC received permission Monday from a Texas judge to modify that plan, allowing the agent to distribute fees clawed back from embattled law firm Jackson Walker LLP to the debtor's unsecured creditors.

  • Mich. Can't Get Immunity In Courthouse ADA Class Action

    Attorneys with disabilities and a disability rights advocate can proceed with a proposed class action aimed at forcing accessibility improvements at several Michigan courthouses and government buildings, a Michigan federal judge ruled Saturday, rejecting the state's argument that it was immune from the suit.  

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    Murdaugh Gets 40 Years For Financial Crimes In Fed. Court

    Alex Murdaugh, the disgraced former South Carolina lawyer serving a life sentence for murder, was hit with a concurrent 40-year prison term in federal court Monday after pleading guilty to stealing at least $9 million from clients.

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    Schumer Warns Texas Court Not To Continue Judge Shopping

    The U.S. Senate will consider legislation to curtail judge shopping after the Northern District of Texas' chief judge rejected calls for the district to take steps to end the "odious" practice on its own, the Senate leader said Monday.

  • NJ Courts Get Out Of Suit Alleging Ex-Judge Harassed Official

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts has gotten out of a lawsuit from a municipal court administrator alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge, arguing that the woman was never an employee of the office.

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    Cooper University Health Names Ex-Judge As 1st Legal Chief

    Just over six months after retiring from the bench and joining Chiesa Shahinian & Giantomasi PC, a former New Jersey federal judge will become the first chief legal officer for South Jersey health system Cooper University Health Care.

  • James Fredricks and Mark Grundvig

    DOJ Antitrust Enforcement Vets Jump To Skadden, Foley

    Two veterans of the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division have headed to private practice in Washington, D.C., with one joining Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP and another leaving the government for Foley & Lardner LLP, the firms said Monday.

  • Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Jailed Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Witness Tampering In Tax Case

    A Chicago-area lawyer facing more than a dozen criminal tax fraud charges pled not guilty Monday to superseding charges that he tried scripting a bookkeeper's anticipated testimony, but he'll have to wait to learn whether he'll remain jailed until his upcoming retrial.

  • Justices Won't Hear Atty's Bid To Conflict Out Entire Ill. Bench

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the case of a lawyer suspended in Illinois who claimed the state's entire federal judiciary needed to recuse itself from his challenge to Illinois' attorney watchdog.

  • Petition Watch: Off-Label Ads, Retiree Discrimination & PPE

    A Utah attorney has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether allegedly retaliatory IRS summonses can be quashed, and two former pharmaceutical executives are challenging the constitutionality of their convictions for marketing the off-label use of a drug. Here, Law360 looks at recently filed petitions that you might've missed.

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Expert Analysis

  • Confronting The Stigma Of Alcohol Abuse In Legal Industry Author Photo

    The pandemic has likely exacerbated the prevalence of problem drinking in the legal profession, making it critical for lawyers and educators to address alcohol abuse and the associated stigma through issue-specific education, supportive assistance and alcohol-free professional events, says Erica Grigg at the Texas Lawyers' Assistance Program.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Have Duty To Push For Immigration Court Reform Author Photo

    Attorneys must use their collective voice to urge federal lawmakers to create an Article I immigration court outside executive branch control, helping address the conflicts of interest, political influence and lack of adjudication consistency that prevent migrants from achieving true justice, say Elia Diaz-Yaeger and Carlos Bollar at the Hispanic National Bar Association.

  • Series

    ​​​​​​​Ask A Mentor: How Can 1st-Year Attys Manage Remote Work? Author Photo

    First-year associates can have a hard time building relationships with colleagues, setting boundaries and prioritizing work-life balance in a remote work environment, so they must be sure to lean on their firms' support systems and practice good time management, say Jenny Lee and Christopher Fernandez at Kirkland.

  • 5 Ways To Lead Lawyer Teams Toward Better Mental Health Author Photo

    Attorney team leaders have a duty to attend to the mental well-being of their subordinates with intention, thought and candor — starting with ensuring their own mental health is in order, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • How Your Summer Associate Events Can Convey Inclusivity Author Photo

    As law firms begin planning next year's summer associate events, they should carefully examine how choice of venue, activity, theme, attendees and formality can create feelings of exclusion for minority associates, and consider changing the status quo to create multiculturally inclusive events, says Sharon Jones at Jones Diversity.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Negotiate Long-Term Flex Work? Author Photo

    Though the pandemic has shown the value of remote work, many firms are still reluctant to embrace flexible working arrangements when offices reopen, so attorneys should use several negotiating tactics to secure a long-term remote or hybrid work setup that also protects their potential for career advancement, says Elaine Spector at Harrity & Harrity.

  • What I Wish Law Schools Taught Women About Legal Careers Author Photo

    Instead of spending an entire semester on 19th century hunting rights, I wish law schools would facilitate honest discussions about what it’s like to navigate life as an attorney, woman and mother, and offer lessons on business marketing that transcend golf outings and social mixers, says Daphne Delvaux at Gruenberg Law.

  • 4 Ways To Break Down Barriers For Women Of Color In Law Author Photo

    Female lawyers belonging to minority groups continue to be paid less and promoted less than their male counterparts, so law firms and corporate legal departments must stop treating women as a monolithic group and create initiatives that address the unique barriers women of color face, say Daphne Turpin Forbes at Microsoft and Linda Chanow at the Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession.

  • Opinion

    We Need More Professional Diversity In The Federal Judiciary Author Photo

    With the current overrepresentation of former corporate lawyers on the federal bench, the Biden administration must prioritize professional diversity in judicial nominations and consider lawyers who have represented workers, consumers and patients, says Navan Ward, president of the American Association for Justice.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Retire Without Creating Chaos? Author Photo

    Retired attorney Vernon Winters explains how lawyers can thoughtfully transition into retirement while protecting their firms’ interests and allaying clients' fears, with varying approaches that turn on the nature of one's practice, client relationships and law firm management.

  • Why I Went From Litigator To Law Firm Diversity Officer Author Photo

    Narges Kakalia at Mintz recounts her journey from litigation partner to director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the firm, explaining how the challenges she faced as a female lawyer of color shaped her transition and why attorneys’ unique skill sets make them well suited for diversity leadership roles.

  • For Asian American Lawyers, Good Mentorship Is Crucial Author Photo

    Navigating the legal world as an Asian American lawyer comes with unique challenges — from cultural stereotypes to a perceived lack of leadership skills — but finding good mentors and treating mentorship as a two-way street can help junior lawyers overcome some of the hurdles and excel, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Coping With Secondary Trauma From Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    As the need for pro bono services continues to grow in tandem with the pandemic, attorneys should assess their mental well-being and look for symptoms of secondary traumatic stress, while law firms must carefully manage their public service programs and provide robust mental health services to employees, says William Silverman at Proskauer.

  • How Firms Can Benefit From Creating Their Own ALSPs Author Photo

    As more law firms develop their own legal services centers to serve as both a source of flexible personnel and technological innovation, they can further enhance the effectiveness by fostering a consistent and cohesive team and allowing for experimentation with new technologies from an established baseline, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Modernizing Legal Education Through Hybrid JD Programs Author Photo

    Amid pandemic-era shifts in education, law schools and other stakeholders should consider the wide geographic and demographic reach of Juris Doctor programs with both online and in-person learning options, and educators should think through the various ways hybrid programs can be structured, says Stephen Burnett at All Campus.

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