Daily Litigation

  • SEC Ordered To Pay $1.8M Over Crypto Case Sanctions

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is on the hook for more than $1.8 million in attorney and receiver fees arising from its allegedly ill-gotten temporary restraining order against crypto project Debt Box, though a Utah federal judge allowed the agency the opportunity to refile the enforcement case despite protests from the defendants.

  • Mich. Judge Tosses Ex-Prosecutor's Suit Over Firing

    A Michigan federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit from a fired assistant prosecutor alleging he lost his job at the Macomb County Prosecutor's Office for speaking out about harassment and retaliation, after the county asked for sanctions because the plaintiff wasn't complying with discovery requirements and missed a deposition.

  • Chicken Buyers Defend Additional $37M Atty Fee Ask

    Direct chicken buyers who have inked more than $284 million in price-fixing settlements defended their counsel's request for more than $37 million in what would be their third payout in the massive case, saying the request is consistent with both precedent and past experience.

  • Ex-Partners Oppose Dismissal Of Bankruptcy Firm's Ch. 11

    Two ex-partners of bankrupt Minnesota consumer bankruptcy firm LifeBack Law Firm have restated their request that a Minnesota bankruptcy judge wrest control of the firm from its "disruptive" current controlling partner rather than grant the dismissal requested by the U.S. Trustee's Office.

  • Immigration Programs' Survival Justifies $3.7M Fee, Attys Say

    The attorneys who challenged Trump-era orders ending immigration protections for people from countries in crisis are seeking a $3.7 million fee award, telling a California federal judge that the Biden administration's rescission of the orders showed their lawsuit was successful.

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    Seeger Weiss Secures Latest Fee Bid In NFL Concussion Case

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Tuesday granted Seeger Weiss LLP's latest fee request for close to $1.9 million in attorney fees and costs for its ongoing work implementing an agreement settling former National Football League players' concussion-linked disability claims.

  • Ex-Florida Atty Accused Of Failing To Deliver Condo Proceeds

    A disbarred attorney was sued in Florida state court by a client who alleged fraud and breach of fiduciary duty in a Miami Beach condominium foreclosure action, saying he misappropriated more than $68,000 in proceeds.

  • Mich. Atty Can't Have Dominion Info, Pa. Court Told

    Dominion Voting Systems told a Pennsylvania state court Tuesday that information copied from election machines as part of a county's fraud probe was "fruit of the poisonous tree" and can't be shared with a Michigan attorney who has been in hot water for allegedly accessing other states' machine data and releasing the privileged information.

  • Ga. Law Firm Beats Sanctions Over Fatal Crash Mistrial

    The Georgia Court of Appeals has thrown out sanctions against an Atlanta civil litigation law firm requiring the firm to pay more than $584,000 in attorney fees and costs for not uncovering a purported conflict that caused a mistrial in a fatal crash lawsuit, finding the trial court's decision was excessive and not supported by evidence.

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    Beasley Allen, J&J Trade Barbs Over DQ Bid In Talc Litigation

    Johnson & Johnson and the Beasley Allen Law Firm have accused each other by turns of "gamesmanship" and "unscrupulous conduct" in New Jersey courts in a fight over whether the firm should be disqualified from talcum powder litigation for allegedly collaborating in secret with a former J&J outside counsel.

  • Legal Lenders Can't Avoid Hurricane Ads Suit, Plaintiff Argues

    Funding companies that lent $20 million to a Texas law firm accused of using it to deceptively solicit hurricane victims can't escape liability by claiming they didn't know how attorneys were using the money or "simply because they don't have offices in the state," according to a Louisiana woman at the forefront of a putative class action.

  • Pa. Debt Collector Missed Window To Appeal Customer's Win

    A debt collection firm's late appeal of a judge's ruling that dismissed its claim against a Pittsburgh-area woman constitutes harassment and violates several consumer protection statutes, according to a new complaint filed by the woman in Allegheny County court.

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    Littler Brings On Ogletree Pay Equity Leader In NYC

    Employment and labor law giant Littler Mendelson PC announced Tuesday that it has grown its New York team with the addition of a pay transparency law expert and former pay equity practice group co-chair at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

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    Approach The Bench: Judge Humetewa Talks Tribal Relations

    Before she joined the federal bench in Arizona, Judge Diane Humetewa worked as a jurist on a relatively young court, where she regularly set new legal precedent.

  • 11th Circ. Revives Ex-Legal Process Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit reopened a former legal services company employee's lawsuit claiming her boss defaced her car because she complained that a Black colleague wasn't assigning work to white process servers, ruling a trial court used the wrong standard to evaluate her retaliation claims.

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    Lin Wood Wants Fraud Claims Kept Out Of Defamation Trial

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood has asked a Georgia federal judge to bar his former law partners, who allege he falsely accused them of attempted extortion, from introducing evidence at an upcoming August trial related to two separate and still pending suits filed against him in Fulton County.

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    King & Spalding Int'l Arbitration Atty Goes Solo In Chicago

    A King & Spalding LLP international arbitration partner based in Chicago announced that he has left the law firm to launch a solo practice focused on investor-state and commercial arbitration and other alternative dispute resolution matters.

  • Cannabis Company Fights Sanctions Bid In $10M Contract Suit

    A cannabis company has opposed a sanctions request in a dispute surrounding its merger with Connecticut marijuana business Theraplant LLC, saying it met document production deadlines despite an opposing attorney's claim that he couldn't open a link emailed at 11:53 p.m. via a password that followed at 11:59 p.m.

  • NJ Panel Won't Revive Atty's Turnpike Authority Harassment Suit

    A New Jersey state appeals court panel stood by an attorney's loss Friday in his suit claiming the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and its officials held him back from promotions and raises and harassed him based on his military service in the U.S. National Guard.

  • Atty Says Loss Of BP Spill Claim Was Client's Fault, Not Firm's

    Texas attorney Brent W. Coon has told a Houston court that his firm's alleged botching of a former client's lawsuit stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill was actually the client's fault, as he failed to provide the firm with a sworn statement to attach to his complaint per a court's order.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The justices issued three rulings this week, including a unanimous one about arbitrability in a case involving a cryptocurrency exchange, and divided ones concerning racial gerrymandering and sentencing enhancements for those with drug convictions. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • Alabama Judge Says Attys Subverted Plumbing Defect Deal

    In an effort to safeguard the due process rights of hundreds of homeowners, an Alabama federal judge has tossed out more than 300 settlement class "opt-outs" and partially reopened the objection period in a product liability suit, determining that outside attorneys repeatedly misled clients regarding the pending settlement, leading to the numerous exclusion requests.

  • Foley & Lardner Given All-Clear To Exit SEC Suit

    A North Carolina federal judge permitted Foley & Lardner LLP on Friday to exit as counsel for a Malta-based registered investment adviser that is defending claims in a $75 million lawsuit brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, despite the judge's previous concerns about the firm's withdrawal.

  • Any Coloradan Can Enforce Open Meetings Law, Panel Says

    The Colorado Court of Appeals has sided with an attorney who has filed dozens of open meetings law claims against government bodies in the state, finding that the attorney has standing to sue a school board even though he lives hundreds of miles away.

  • Law360's Legal Lions Of The Week

    It was a week of mammoth wins for petite law firms, with two intellectual property boutiques — Lex Lumina PLLC and Irwin IP LLP — leading off this week's Law360 Legal Lions list with an explosive win at the Federal Circuit throwing out "rigid" tests for design patents.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Innovative Ways AI May Be Used In Legal Practice
    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly be used by outside counsel to better predict the outcomes of litigation — thus informing legal strategy with greater precision — and by clients to scrutinize invoices and evaluate counsel’s performance, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

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    My Nonpracticing Law Job: Librarian Author Photo

    Lisa A. Goodman at Texas A&M University shares how she went from a BigLaw associate who liked to hang out in the firm's law library to director of a law library herself in just over a decade, and provides considerations for anyone interested in pursuing a law librarian career.

  • Legal Briefs Can Benefit From Cleaned Up Case Citations Author Photo

    Federal courts have recently been changing the way they quote decisions to omit insignificant details and string cites, and lawyers should consider adopting this practice to enhance the readability of their briefs — as long as accuracy stays top of mind, says Diana Simon at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.

  • 5 Best Practices For Firms Designing DEI Programs Author Photo

    Nikki Lewis Simon, chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer at Greenberg Traurig, discusses best practices — and some pitfalls to avoid — for law firms looking to build programs aimed at driving inclusion in the workplace.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs Author Photo

    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Ask A Mentor: How Do I Juggle Billables And Other Activities? Author Photo

    While involvement in internal firm initiatives can be rewarding both personally and professionally, associates' billable time requirements don’t leave much room for other work, meaning they must develop strategies to ensure they’re meeting all of their commitments while remaining balanced, says Melanie Webber at Fisher Phillips.

  • Making Legal Cents: How To Adapt As Clients Tighten Budgets Author Photo

    Amid a dip in corporate legal spending and client pushback on bills, Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants highlights specific in-house counsel frustrations and explains how firms can provide customized legal advice with costs that are supported by undeniable value.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • General Counsel And Legal Ops Must Work Together Author Photo

    It is critical for general counsel to ensure that a legal operations leader is viewed not only as a peer, but as a strategic leader for the organization, and there are several actionable ways general counsel can not only become more involved, but help champion legal operations teams and set them up for success, says Mary O'Carroll at Ironclad.

  • How Generative AI's Growing Memory Affects Lawyers Author Photo

    A new ChatGPT feature that can remember user information across different conversations has broad implications for attorneys, whose most pressing questions for the AI tool are usually based on specific, and large, datasets, says legal tech adviser Eric Wall.

  • A Model For Optimal Legal Tech Investment Strategy Author Photo

    Legal organizations struggling to work out the right technology investment strategy may benefit from using a matrix for legal department efficiency that is based on an understanding of where workloads belong, according to the basic functions and priorities of a corporate legal team, says Sylvain Magdinier at Integreon.

  • Series

    My Nonpracticing Law Job: Recruiter Author Photo

    Self-proclaimed "Lawyer Doula" Danielle Thompson at Major Lindsey shares how she went from Columbia Law School graduate and BigLaw employment associate to a career in legal recruiting — and discovered a passion for advocacy along the way.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Balance Social Activism With My Job? Author Photo

    Corporate attorneys pursuing social justice causes outside of work should consider eight guidelines for finding equilibrium between their beliefs and their professional duties and reputation, say Diedrick Graham, Debra Friedman and Simeon Brier at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Personality Tests And Machine Learning Applications In Law Author Photo

    Mateusz Kulesza at McDonnell Boehnen looks at potential applications of personality testing based on machine learning techniques for law firms, and the implications this shift could have for lawyers, firms and judges, including how it could make the work of judges and other legal decision-makers much more difficult.

  • AI Is Reshaping Lawyering: What To Expect In 2024 Author Photo

    The future of lawyering is not about the wholesale replacement of attorneys by artificial intelligence, but as AI handles more of the routine legal work, the role of lawyers will evolve to be more strategic, requiring the development of competencies beyond traditional legal skills, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

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