Washington

  • March 14, 2024

    Wash. Atty Who Ducked Bar Probe Suspended For 3 Years

    A Washington state attorney has agreed to a three-year suspension for suing the wrong person in a vehicle crash lawsuit, ghosting his client and an insurer involved and later trying to evade a legal malpractice judgment and disciplinary investigation, according to the Washington State Bar Association.

  • March 14, 2024

    Potential Nine-Figure Deal Ends NXP, Impinj Chip Patent Row

    Rival chipmakers Impinj and NXP have agreed to settle multiple patent infringement suits between them following trial victories for Impinj, in a deal where Impinj said NXP will pay it more than $195 million if the license runs for its entire term.

  • March 14, 2024

    Game Developer Seeks Class Cert. In Valve Antitrust Case

    Developer Wolfire Games is asking a Seattle federal judge for class certification in its consolidated antitrust suit against online game seller Valve, saying discovery has brought abundant evidence that the platform uses its most-favored-nation clause to stifle competition and maintain monopoly power.

  • March 14, 2024

    Bechtel Missed Subcontractor Targets On Nuke Waste Project

    Bechtel National Inc. failed its subcontracting obligations while building a federal nuclear waste plant at the Hanford site in Washington state, lapses that cost businesses up to $700 million in missed opportunities, according to a watchdog agency report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Wash. Real Estate Co.'s Ch 11 Plan OK'd After Judgment Slashed

    Washington state-based commercial and residential real estate company High Valley Investments LLC 's Chapter 11 plan received a Delaware bankruptcy judge's blessing Thursday after a settlement agreement slashed a $47.4 million judgment against it to an $18 million claim.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ford Slammed For Bid To 'Sidestep' Faulty Axle-Bolt Suit

    Two Washington SUV owners suing Ford for allegedly slacking on safety in newer Explorer models have accused the vehicle maker of trying to "sidestep liability" in their proposed class action by pointing to two recalls that didn't address the design flaw at issue.

  • March 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Is Asked To Revive LegalForce's TM Dispute

    Intellectual property firm LegalForce RAPC Worldwide PC has taken its trademark battle with a Japanese company over the brand "LegalForce" to the Ninth Circuit, arguing in its appeal that a federal statute dictates that infringement can occur through equity sales to investors.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 13, 2024

    Amazon Ducks Consumers' 'Buy Box'-Shipping Antitrust Suit

    Amazon.com is facing one less consumer antitrust suit after a Seattle federal judge said Wednesday that Prime members failed to define the relevant market or explain how they were harmed by policies tying placement of the "Buy Box" feature with sellers paying for its shipping services and cannot fix the shortcomings of their complaint.

  • March 13, 2024

    9th Circ. Unsure If Abortion Pill Suit Harms Red States

    Two Ninth Circuit judges on Wednesday challenged Idaho and other Republican-led states' bid to intervene in Washington's lawsuit seeking to expand access to the abortion pill mifepristone, asking if the states could back up their claims of economic harm.

  • March 13, 2024

    Cherry IP Deception Claims Would Inflame Jury, Canada Says

    The Canadian government has told a Washington federal judge that jurors should not hear allegations that its IP licenser deceived the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in a trial against Washington fruit growers it claims rebranded a unique Canadian sweet cherry variety as their own, citing the "inflammatory" nature of the growers' counterclaim.

  • March 13, 2024

    Colo. Justices Doubt Amazon's Math For Holiday Incentives

    Several Colorado Supreme Court justices were skeptical Wednesday about Amazon's claim that it can exclude extra holiday wages from workers' overtime payouts, asking what the company didn't understand about a state requirement to include "all compensation" in its overtime calculations.

  • March 13, 2024

    Ex-Boeing IP Manager's Counsel Secures $224K In Fees

    A Washington federal judge has awarded more than $224,000 in attorney fees to a former Boeing intellectual property manager after finding that the company retaliated against him for speaking up against the poor treatment of other workers.

  • March 13, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Sue Kaiser Over Missed Breaks

    A nursing assistant at Seattle's Kaiser Permanente hospital said understaffing compels her and other healthcare employees to work through their meal breaks, but that the hospital system has not been paying them for that time, according to a proposed class action filed in Washington state court.

  • March 13, 2024

    Wash. Law Firm, Travelers Settle $136K Theft Coverage Fight

    A Seattle law firm and Travelers settled their coverage dispute over an employee's nearly $136,000 worth of unauthorized charges on a credit card, the parties told a Washington federal court.

  • March 13, 2024

    Wash. Assessor Was Wrong To Deny COVID Relief, Hotels Say

    A business group representing Washington hotels told a state court that a county assessor erred when he refused to lower the 2020 property assessments for hotels in the area due to financial losses stemming from the coronavirus pandemic.

  • March 13, 2024

    Kids' Hospital Cuts Deal To End EEOC Harassment Probe

    Seattle Children's Hospital agreed to pay $125,000 to resolve the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's charge that it subjected a nurse to a sexually charged work atmosphere and then failed to step in when she complained.

  • March 12, 2024

    Amazon Denies Concealing Texts In Alexa Users' Privacy Suit

    Amazon has rebuffed claims that it withheld text messages in a proposed class action brought by unregistered Alexa users who alleged they were illegally recorded, arguing the plaintiffs accused the technology giant of yet another failure as discovery closes to "cast aspersions on Amazon's diligence and motives."

  • March 12, 2024

    Daiichi Urges Court To OK Arbitrator's Award Against Seagan

    Japanese drugmaker Daiichi Sankyo has asked a Seattle federal judge not to toss an arbitral award refusing Seagen Inc.'s claims for billions of dollars in a dispute over cancer drug patents, saying the U.S. biotech company has incorrectly lodged a petition to vacate the award.

  • March 12, 2024

    Yardi, Landlords Say Hagens Berman Can't Lead Antitrust Suit

    Property management software company Yardi Systems Inc. and multiple landlords are fighting a putative class's bid to appoint Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP as interim lead counsel for a rent price-fixing class action in Washington federal court.

  • March 12, 2024

    Judge Questions If Citibank Can Avoid Escrow Theft Burden

    A Washington appellate judge questioned Tuesday if Citibank and a loan servicer could escape liability after a rogue escrow agent stole nearly $1 million from a real estate company's refinancing deals, suggesting during oral arguments that the bank gets loan payments as successor lender and should bear some burden.

  • March 12, 2024

    Amazon Fights FTC Bid To Split Antitrust Trial

    Amazon is urging a Washington federal court to reject a bid from the Federal Trade Commission to split the monopolization case against it into two phases, saying the court will have to consider any potential fixes when deciding if the company violated antitrust law.

  • March 12, 2024

    Wash. Judge Skeptical Of Models' Strip Club Ad Claims

    A Washington federal judge seemed doubtful Tuesday of models' damages bid against a Seattle cabaret that allegedly used their images without permission, unconvinced that those who spotted the ads would truly believe such elite models worked at the "mediocre" strip club with bad Yelp ratings.

  • March 12, 2024

    Challenge To Seattle's Caste Bias Ban Comes Up Short

    A Washington federal judge threw out a lawsuit that claimed Seattle's ban on caste discrimination "demonized" South Asians and violated the First Amendment, ruling the city's ordinance does not target any ethnic or racial group.

  • March 12, 2024

    Judge Lets Feds Appeal 'Novel' Issues In Asylum Bond Suit

    A Washington federal judge allowed federal immigration agencies to seek the Ninth Circuit's opinion on whether the district court can hear a class of asylum-seekers' lawsuit alleging deprivation of bond hearings, saying jurisdictional and constitutional issues in the case seem novel.

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Pesticide Labeling Bill, 9th Circ. Case Could Cut Prop 65 Suits

    Author Photo

    Both a pending bill in the U.S. House of Representatives and a case currently on appeal before the Ninth Circuit could constrain California's ability to require Proposition 65 warnings on pesticide products — thus potentially preventing numerous lawsuits and bringing relief to businesses across the country, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

    Author Photo

    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • CFPB, FTC Actions Show Consumer Terms Need Fresh Eyes

    Author Photo

    Providers of consumer financial products and services should take recent statements and actions from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Federal Trade Commission as an invitation to review their consumer-facing disclosures to ensure that the terms are clear, easy to understand and prominently displayed, say Christina Grigorian and Eric Hail at Katten.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

    Author Photo

    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Checking In On How SuperValu Has Altered FCA Litigation

    Author Photo

    Four months after the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in U.S. ex rel. Chutte v. SuperValu, the decision's reach may be more limited than initially anticipated, with the expansion of the scienter standard counterbalanced by some potential defense tools for defendants, say Elena Quattrone and Olivia Plinio at Epstein Becker.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

    Author Photo

    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

    Author Photo

    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

    Author Photo

    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Circuit Rulings Confirm Ch. 11 Trustee Fee Refund Trend

    Author Photo

    Recent Ninth and Eleventh Circuit rulings that Chapter 11 debtors are entitled to refunds for unconstitutional bankruptcy trustee fees paid under the Bankruptcy Judgeship Act support a developing trend in debtors' favor, making it likely that courts considering the same question will follow suit, says Adam Herring at Nelson Mullins.

  • RICO Trade Secret Standard Prevails Within 9th Circ. Courts

    Author Photo

    Federal courts in the Ninth Circuit seem to be requiring a relatively high degree of factual detail — arguably more than is expressly mandated by statute — to plead and maintain Racketeer and Corrupt Organizations Act claims in trade secret disputes, says Cary Sullivan at Jones Day.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

    Author Photo

    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • Amgen-Horizon Deal May Signal FTC's Return To Bargaining

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's recent settlement of its challenge to Amgen's proposed acquisition of Horizon Therapeutics marks the latest in a string of midlitigation settlements, and may signal that competition regulators are more inclined toward such negotiations following recent litigation losses, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

    Author Photo

    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Washington archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!