Washington

  • March 22, 2024

    US Antitrust Enforcers Keep Big Tech Cases Coming

    A backlash against powerful tech companies is reaching a fever pitch in the U.S., as enforcers with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission now have pending lawsuits accusing Apple, Amazon, Google and Meta of monopolizing key digital markets.

  • March 22, 2024

    Microsoft Settles Fired Trans Engineer's Bias Suit

    Microsoft agreed to settle a transgender former software engineer's Washington state court suit alleging that she was fired after repeatedly raising concerns that her work was unfairly criticized by her colleagues and that she was subjected to bullying due to her gender presentation.

  • March 22, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Hires Lewis Brisbois Insurance Vet In Seattle

    Fox Rothschild LLP has hired an insurance litigator in Seattle who focuses her practice on a range of commercial and liability disputes and joins the firm after working for a decade at Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP, the firm has announced.

  • March 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Partially Backs Meta Class Cert. In Ad Reach Row

    A split Ninth Circuit panel on Thursday affirmed certification of a damages class of Meta Platforms advertisers who were allegedly deceived about Facebook's "potential reach" tool, but upended certification of an injunction class, telling the district court to take a fresh look at whether the lead plaintiff actually has standing.

  • March 21, 2024

    SpaceX's Severance Agreement Is Illegal, NLRB Attys Say

    The National Labor Relations Board's Seattle office claimed SpaceX's severance agreement included confidentiality and non-disparagement clauses that violate federal labor law, according to a complaint copy obtained by Law360 on Thursday, with board prosecutors asking for a recorded notice reading scheduled for workers across the country to attend.

  • March 21, 2024

    Wash. Judge Says Debt Collector Owes $827K For Violations

    A Washington state judge has ordered a medical debt collector to pay more than $827,000 in penalties for failing to include certain debtor's rights information in collection notices sent to tens of thousands of Washingtonians for outstanding balances tied to Providence Health & Services hospitals.

  • March 21, 2024

    AGs Urge Congress To Address Hemp Intoxicants In Farm Bill

    A bipartisan coalition of 21 attorneys general is urging Congress to address what the state officials call a public health and safety crisis by amending federal hemp policy to clarify that intoxicating products derived from hemp extracts are not legal under federal law.

  • March 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Rethink Apple App Store Rival's Antitrust Suit

    A split Ninth Circuit panel has refused to rehear a rival app store developer's bid to revive an antitrust suit alleging that Apple monopolizes the market for app distribution on iOS devices with its App store.

  • March 21, 2024

    Home Depot Reaches $20M Class Deal In False Blind-Ad Suit

    Home Depot has reached a roughly $20 million proposed class settlement to resolve allegations that it falsely advertised window treatments as discounted on Blinds.com and other websites, even though the products had never been offered at full price.

  • March 21, 2024

    BNSF, Worker Settle Sick Leave Firing Suit

    BNSF Railway Co. and a conductor who alleged that he was illegally fired for his use of medical leave have reached a settlement to their Family and Medical Leave Act dispute, according to a notice filed in Washington federal court.

  • March 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Rescission Of Homeowner's Property Policies

    Two Safeco insurers are entitled to rescind policies issued to a woman who misrepresented that her house wasn't used for business when in fact it was rented to short-term guests, the Ninth Circuit affirmed, saying there's no genuine issue of material fact as to the commercial use of the property.

  • March 20, 2024

    Biden Taps Judicial Nominees For 6th Circuit, SDNY

    President Joe Biden on Wednesday unveiled a new slate of judicial nominations, including a current U.S. attorney tapped for a Sixth Circuit seat and another federal prosecutor up for a judgeship in the Southern District of New York.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    Amazon Wants Rethink On E-Book Monopolization Suit

    Amazon is asking a New York federal court to reconsider U.S. District Judge Gregory H. Woods' rejection of the company's motion to dismiss a proposed class action alleging that the company has monopolized the e-book market, or to at least certify two questions for the Second Circuit to address on interlocutory appeal.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Feds Didn't Consider LNG Rule's Impact On Tribe, Court Told

    The Puyallup Tribe of Indians has fired back at the U.S. Department of Transportation's defense of a rule permitting bulk rail transport of liquefied natural gas, telling the D.C. Circuit the agency failed to engage in meaningful dialogue during the rule's development.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Ford Pushes To Decertify Classes Amid Mustang Defect Trial

    Ford Motor Co. urged a Florida federal judge Tuesday to undo classes of consumers in four states who allege they were misled when buying high-performance Mustangs, arguing that a jury heard testimony from the drivers this month that the "word was out on these cars" before purchases were made.

  • March 19, 2024

    Ex-Seattle School Administrator Files Race Discrimination Suit

    A former administrator for Seattle Public Schools says the district discriminated against her because of her South Asian heritage and forced her to resign under threat of termination based on false allegations she lied on her job application, according to a new lawsuit in Washington state court.

  • March 19, 2024

    State Court To Hear Seattle's Issue With Vax Firing Arb. Award

    A Washington state court will review an arbitrator's decision to fault the city of Seattle for firing a worker for not getting a COVID-19 vaccination, agreeing to hear the city's argument that the arbitrator improperly weighed in on an issue he wasn't supposed to consider.

  • March 19, 2024

    Wash. Hydro Co. Says Dam Removal Plan Follows Court Order

    A Washington hydroelectric company insists it is not disobeying a court order to remove part of a temporary rock dam that harms migrating fish, telling a federal judge that a tribe's alternative is not structurally sound and cannot be permitted.

  • March 19, 2024

    GEO Fights Wash. Bid For State Inspectors' Entry Into ICE Jail

    GEO Group is pushing back against Washington state's request for a preliminary injunction forcing the private prison operator to let inspectors into a Tacoma-area immigrant detention facility, saying the suit is likely to flop, especially given a federal judge's recent decision to partially suspend the state law regulators have relied upon to get inside.  

  • March 19, 2024

    Tesla Investors Want Musk Go-Private Tweet Spat Revived

    Tesla investors have urged the Ninth Circuit to grant their request for a new trial, saying the California district judge who oversaw the litigation gave improper jury instructions that cleared the electric-car maker and its CEO Elon Musk last year over his alleged 2018 tweets that he had "funding secured" to take the company private.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

    Author Photo

    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • How Legal Teams Can Prep For Life Sciences' Tech Revolution

    Author Photo

    The life sciences and health care industries are uniquely positioned to take advantage of new efficiencies created by cloud computing and generative artificial intelligence, but the sensitivity of their data also demands careful navigation of an expanding legislative and regulatory landscape, say Kristi Gedid, Zack Laplante and Lisa LaMotta at Ernst & Young.

  • Harvard's Broker Fight Shows Active Risk Management Is Key

    Author Photo

    Harvard University’s recently filed suit against its insurance broker for alleged malpractice in handling the Students for Fair Admissions claim illustrates that risk management requires the concerted effort of policyholders, brokers and insurers to protect against disastrous losses, say William McMichael and David Klein at Pillsbury.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

    Author Photo

    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Beware Privacy Risks In Training AI Models With Health Data

    Author Photo

    Because data used to train artificial intelligence models may be protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act or other regulations, users of these models should conduct proper diligence to avoid costly compliance failures, say Neha Matta and Barbara Bennett at Frost Brown.

  • Opinion

    Courts Shouldn't Credit Allegations From Short-Seller Reports

    Author Photo

    Securities class actions against public companies can extend for years and lead to significant settlements, so courts should not allow such cases with allegations wholly reliant on reports by short-sellers, who have an economic interest in seeing a company's stock price decline, to proceed past the motion to dismiss stage, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

    Author Photo

    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • State Regs Sow Discord Between Cannabis, Hemp Industries

    Author Photo

    Connecticut, Maryland and Washington are the latest states choosing to require intoxicating hemp products to comply with the states' recreational marijuana laws, resulting in a widening rift between cannabis and hemp as Congress works on crafting new hemp legislation within the upcoming 2023 Farm Bill, say attorneys at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Washington archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!