Washington

  • April 08, 2024

    AT&T Seeks Justices' Review Of 9th Circ. 401(k) Suit Revival

    AT&T has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Ninth Circuit decision reviving retirement plan mismanagement claims against the telecom giant, arguing that a panel defied court precedent and deepened a circuit split with its ruling knocking out AT&T's summary judgment win.

  • April 08, 2024

    Key Congressional Leaders Float Sweeping Data Privacy Bill

    The heads of the U.S. Senate and House commerce committees have taken a major step toward enacting a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy framework, reaching a long-awaited deal on proposed legislation that would minimize the personal data companies can gather, allow consumers to bring lawsuits and eliminate a growing patchwork of state laws.

  • April 05, 2024

    COVID App Takes Another Shot At Apple With Justices

    App developers are again seeking U.S. Supreme Court intervention against the Ninth Circuit's refusal to revive antitrust allegations over Apple's rejection of COVID-19-tracking and bitcoin apps, decrying "fundamental error" lower courts made misreading pleading requirements, proffered market definition and more.

  • April 05, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Pump-And-Dump Action Against Cartoon Co.

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday revived a securities class action accusing children's entertainment company Genius Brands International Inc. of running a pump-and-dump scheme in its stock, and in doing so likened the court's mission to that of the heroes of the company's cartoon production "Rainbow Rangers."

  • April 05, 2024

    Justices Urged To 'Shut The Door' On Meta Disclosure Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court should "shut the door" on private securities lawsuits that could create a bloated disclosure regime and hurt businesses and investors alike, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said Friday in a brief backing Meta Platforms Inc.'s call for the justices to hear a shareholder proposed class action over the Cambridge Analytica data abuse scandal.

  • April 05, 2024

    Starbucks Tells Judge Union Dealings Aren't 'Mission Critical'

    Starbucks denied Friday that complying with federal labor law was "mission critical" to its business as it urged a Washington state judge to dismiss a shareholder suit accusing company leaders of union busting, which they say tanked Starbucks' reputation.

  • April 05, 2024

    FCC Says Carrier Must Kill Tax Relief Scam Robocalls

    The Federal Communications Commission says it's doing some spring-cleaning and will be clearing out entities supporting clients that make illegal robocalls, starting with a company that has been allowing a client to send out some 15 million calls about a fake tax relief program.

  • April 05, 2024

    Boeing Pays Alaska Airlines $160M For 737 Midair Blowout

    The Boeing Co. has paid $160 million to Alaska Airlines for losses from the midair door plug blowout on a 737 MAX jet that horrified passengers, grounded planes and disrupted flights, according to a regulatory filing from the airline.

  • April 04, 2024

    Homeowner Asks 9th Circ. To Rethink Fire Coverage Ruling

    A woman who was prevented from coverage of a 2021 house fire by the Ninth Circuit asked the court to rehear her case, arguing among other things that she did not lie to her insurer about renting her home, because she didn't fill out the insurance application.

  • April 04, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced Judge's Past Job Hurt Tesla Investor

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive claims brought by a short-seller accusing Tesla Inc. and CEO Elon Musk of using social media to artificially inflate the company's stock, ruling that the plaintiff wasn't prejudiced by a district judge's former employment with the predecessor of a firm that represented Tesla for a portion of the litigation.

  • April 04, 2024

    Parents Deny Need For Defect In Amazon Suicide Suit

    Families accusing Amazon of negligently selling chemicals teens used in their suicides told the Ninth Circuit Wednesday that their suit should get another chance, arguing they did not have to show the lethal chemical was defective in order to prove Amazon's liability.

  • April 04, 2024

    Nurses Want To Merge DaVita Wage Suits Over Unpaid Breaks

    Workers suing kidney care giant DaVita Inc. have asked a Colorado federal judge to consolidate two similar collective actions alleging they were denied wages for work performed during meal and rest breaks, saying overlap between the cases is "inevitable."

  • April 04, 2024

    Wash. AG Defends Authority To Block Kroger-Albertsons Deal

    The Washington Attorney General's Office has told a state court that a local consumer protection law allows it to bring actions challenging anti-competitive mergers and urged the court to reject contentions from Kroger and Albertsons that the state lacks authority to block a nationwide deal.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ex-IRS Agent Caused $42.5M In Tax Loss As Preparer, US Says

    A tax preparer who once worked for the Internal Revenue Service should be permanently barred from preparing federal returns because he caused an estimated $42.5 million in tax losses by scheming to underestimate his clients' liabilities, the government told a Washington federal court.

  • April 04, 2024

    Full 9th Circ. Won't Review PAGA Ruling In Lowe's Suit

    The full Ninth Circuit won't review a panel's decision ruling that a Lowe's worker's nonindividual claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act could stay in court while her individual claims go into arbitration, denying the company's bid to step in.

  • April 03, 2024

    9th Circ. Skeptical Of ADA Suit Against Buddhist Temple

    The Ninth Circuit appeared hesitant Wednesday to revive a former live-in apprentice's disability bias suit against a Buddhist temple, with a panel suggesting that his maintenance duties didn't place him outside the scope of a ministerial exception to anti-discrimination law.

  • April 03, 2024

    Microsoft Notches Fed. Circ. Win In 3D Imaging Patent Fight

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday backed a ruling from an administrative tribunal that wiped out most of a patent issued to a Florida radiologist and his ex-Lockheed Martin business partner, whose company is suing Microsoft over its line of HoloLens AR headsets.

  • April 03, 2024

    Colo. Judge Unpersuaded By Insurer's 3rd Dismissal Bid

    A Colorado federal judge recommended keeping alive an insurer's lawsuit seeking a declaration that it doesn't owe $4 million in coverage to a climbing equipment manufacturer and its primary insurer over a recalled product, calling a third dismissal bid a "wasted effort."

  • April 03, 2024

    Nationstar Adds 'Junk Fee' For Loan Payoff Quote, Suit Says

    A proposed class hit Nationstar Mortgage LLC with a suit alleging the mortgage servicing firm illegally charges homeowners a "junk fee" for written payoff quotes in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

  • April 03, 2024

    9th Circ. Doubts Kosher Tester's Religious Carveout Challenge

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday seemed skeptical of a worker's argument that the ministerial exception does not apply to his suit accusing an Orthodox Jewish organization of failing to pay him overtime for his work making sure grapes used for wines were kept kosher.

  • April 03, 2024

    Models Get $95K Default Win In Strip Club Piracy Suit

    A Washington federal judge ordered a Seattle strip club to pay a group of professional models $95,000 in damages on Wednesday, after finding it had engaged in "amateur piracy" by using their photos without permission and failed to defend itself.

  • April 03, 2024

    Tort Report: Cert Bid For NY Gun Law; Insult Atty Update

    A high court challenge of New York's gun sales law and an update on disciplinary proceedings against an attorney who hurled insults at judges, calling them "scumbags," lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • April 03, 2024

    Insurer, DC Teams' Owner End Virus Coverage Dispute

    The owner of Washington, D.C., professional basketball and hockey teams and its insurer agreed to end their COVID-19 coverage dispute after the owner appealed the dismissal of its coverage claims to the D.C. Circuit.

  • April 03, 2024

    Beekeeper Groups Seek Fees From EPA After 9th Circ. Appeal

    Attorneys for beekeeper groups in an appeal over a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency decision on insecticides have asked the Ninth Circuit to award nearly $750,000 in legal fees after a ruling that hammered the EPA but left the agency's decision intact.

  • April 03, 2024

    Skanska Inks $1.4B Contract To Replace Seattle Bridge

    Skanska and Washington's Department of Transportation closed a $1.4 billion bridge replacement contract that aims to update Seattle's Portage Bay Bridge so that it's up to "current seismic resiliency standards," the construction and development company announced.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • FTC 'Dark Patterns' Enforcement Signals Consent Theory Shift

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent complaint against Amazon for using dark patterns to trick consumers signals a general trend in American jurisprudence of importing a European theory of consent, which could result in a more turgid digital experience, says Christian Auty at BCLP.

  • Wash. Class Actions Are Coming After My Health My Data Act

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    With its expansive scope and private right of action — including possible class actions — for damages, Washington state’s recently enacted My Health My Data Act will be the basis for a great deal of litigation, and companies should be mindful that plaintiffs will need to prove actual, monetary harm, says Tom Nolan at Quinn Emanuel.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Opinion

    3 Principles Should Guide MTC's Digital Products Tax Work

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    As the Multistate Tax Commission's project to harmonize sales tax on digital products moves forward, three key principles will help the commission's work group arrive at unambiguous definitions and help states avoid unintended costs, say Charles Kearns and Jeffrey Friedman at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • What Justices' Pork Ruling Means For Interstate Cannabis

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent National Pork v. Ross ruling added a new wrinkle to dormant commerce clause jurisprudence as the nation’s federal courts grapple with a novel paradox raised by interstate cannabis commerce, and pending appellate cases may shed additional light on these issues later this year, say Tommy Tobin and Andrew Kline at Perkins Coie.

  • How High Court Is Assessing Tribal Law Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's four rulings on tribal issues from this term show that Justice Neil Gorsuch's extensive experience in federal Native American law brings helpful experience to the court but does not necessarily guarantee favorable outcomes for tribal interests, say attorneys at Dorsey & Whitney.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Trends Emerge In High Court's Criminal Law Decisions

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    In its 2022-2023 term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued nine merits decisions in criminal cases covering a wide range of issues, and while each decision is independently important, when viewed together, key trends and takeaways appear that will affect defendants moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • It All Comes Down To Choice Of Law In Nazi-Looted Art Case

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in a nearly 20-year ownership battle over a Nazi-looted painting shows the court lacked adequate guidance on how California's choice-of-law rule should be applied to stolen property and that the choice of law — between California or Spain — will likely determine whose claim to the painting prevails, says Kevin Ray at Greenberg Traurig.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • 4 New State Geofencing Bans And How They Differ

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    Washington, New York, Connecticut and Nevada have now enacted laws prohibiting geofencing around locations that provide certain health care services, but these new laws vary widely, with Washington taking the broadest and most restrictive approach, say Andreas Kaltsounis and Nichole Sterling at BakerHostetler.

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