Washington

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Doubts Feds' Gambling Stance Matches Tribe's

    A Ninth Circuit judge pushed back Wednesday against a gambling company's argument that a particular Washington tribe did not need to be a part of its lawsuit over state gambling compacts, pointing out that the federal government is expected to balance competing interests — not necessarily mirror the tribes' position.

  • March 27, 2024

    On Deck In JPML: Baby Food, 23andMe Privacy, NCAA

    The Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation's packed meeting Thursday in South Carolina will see the panel mulling consolidation of privacy litigation against 23andMe, claims of heavy metals in baby food, and scholarship-fixing claims by student athletes against the NCAA — and that's just for starters.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Rejects Rust-Oleum's Bid To Sink Class Cert.

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday upheld the certification of a class of Rust-Oleum customers who are suing the company for allegedly greenwashing its degreaser products with the terms "non-toxic" and "Earth friendly."

  • March 27, 2024

    Bungie, YouTuber Settle False Copyright Infringement Suit

    An online gamer has settled a lawsuit filed by video game developer Bungie Inc. after a Washington federal judge ruled earlier this month that the gamer illegally posed as a company employee and reported Bungie fans' YouTube videos as copyright violations, according to a court order Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Meta Settles Fired Worker's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    Facebook parent company Meta has agreed to settle a Washington federal suit brought by a former project manager who claimed he was illegally fired after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19 because of his religious beliefs.

  • March 26, 2024

    Consumers Push For New 9th Circ. Panel In Qualcomm Case

    Cellphone buyers are coming out strong against Qualcomm's request to have the same Ninth Circuit panel that vacated their class certification hear an appeal to revive the long-running antitrust litigation over the company's licensing practices, saying there is no reason for "meddling with the usual practice for assigning cases."

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Frees College From Off-Campus Rape Suit

    The Ninth Circuit says a Washington university does not need to face claims by a woman who was raped at an off-campus party during her freshman year, as it was expected to do following a state supreme court ruling in the school's favor. 

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Tanker Can't Be Used To Enforce $10M Debt

    The Ninth Circuit affirmed on Monday that a nearly 800-foot crude oil tanker could not be seized to enforce some $10 million in arbitral awards against a defunct gas shipping company, ruling that the plaintiffs couldn't prove the tanker's owner had helped to hide the shipping company's assets.

  • March 26, 2024

    Subaru Can't Duck Suit Over Starlink Infotainment Defect

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday declined to throw out a proposed class action alleging the Starlink infotainment system in certain Subaru vehicles is defective, throwing out one plaintiff's state consumer protection claim, while allowing the remaining claims to go forward.

  • March 26, 2024

    Pilot HOA Tells Justices Rail Easement Clouds Airstrip Access

    An Alaska homeowners association made up largely of pilots has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Ninth Circuit ruling granting a railroad full control of an easement jutting into an airstrip used by residents of a surrounding subdivision.

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Unsure Uber Can Dodge Suit Over Slain Driver

    A pair of Ninth Circuit judges seemed to question Tuesday if Uber Technologies Inc. could avoid liability after a driver was murdered in a carjacking, with one judge asking if the law needed to catch up with new technology in a case where the company controlled information about the identity of riders.

  • March 26, 2024

    Starbucks Settles Worker's Suit Alleging Manager Groped Her

    Starbucks Corp. has settled a lawsuit with an employee who alleged her reports of groping and harassment by a manger resulted in a retaliatory investigation, stunting her career with the coffee chain.

  • March 26, 2024

    Fishers Say Tire Cos. Can't Escape Salmon ESA Suit

    Fishing groups are fighting tire companies' attempt to dismiss an Endangered Species Act suit over the use of a rubber additive known as 6PPD, which harms salmon, telling a California federal judge the companies are trying to delay accountability.

  • March 26, 2024

    Boeing Can't Exit Wash. Worker's Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge has declined to throw out a lawsuit accusing Boeing of exposing a factory worker to chemicals that caused birth defects in his child, after casting doubt last month on the company's assertion it had no legal duty to protect employees' future children from foreseeable harm.

  • March 26, 2024

    Greens Sue NRC Over Delayed Diablo Canyon Inspections

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission violated federal law when it rejected community and environmental groups' request for a public hearing over allegedly outdated inspections at Diablo Canyon, California's last remaining nuclear power plant, the groups told the Ninth Circuit on Monday.

  • March 26, 2024

    Wash. Appeals Court Reinstates Nurse's Sex Harassment Suit

    A trial court jumped the gun when it tossed a lawsuit from a nurse who said a University of Washington-owned air ambulance outfit transferred her after she complained about sexual harassment, a state appeals court ruled, saying a reasonable jury could find in her favor.

  • March 26, 2024

    K&L Gates Adds Ex-Suncor Atty To Energy Team In Seattle

    K&L Gates LLP has announced it is expanding its environment, land and natural resources practice capabilities in Seattle with the addition of a seasoned partner with two decades of diverse environmental policy experience including private practice, in-house and government work.

  • March 25, 2024

    Boeing Called Out For 'Circular' Logic In Love-Triangle Murder

    A Washington federal judge suggested on Monday that it would be unfair to let Being avoid liability in the early stages of a case involving a love-triangle among workers that ended in murder, calling the argument against allowing litigation to move forward "circular."

  • March 25, 2024

    COVID 'Cure' Claims Can't Sustain Fraud Suit, 9th Circ. Rules

    A biopharmaceutical company's "enthusiastic" statements to Fox News and others about a potential COVID-19 cure do not amount to fraud and cannot sustain a shareholder lawsuit accusing the company and its top executives of deceiving the market by pretending that a breakthrough was much more consequential than it actually was, the Ninth Circuit ruled on Monday.

  • March 25, 2024

    Wash. Asks Judge To Undo Block Of ICE Detention Center Law

    Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has urged a federal judge to reconsider a recent ruling halting the state from conducting unannounced inspections and imposing new health and safety standards at an immigration detention facility, saying the decision "rests on legal error."

  • March 25, 2024

    Kroger Says Sweetened Merger Deal Will Sink Antitrust Doubts

    Kroger told a Colorado state judge Monday that it plans to "enhance" its $24.6 billion Albertson's merger to satisfy federal and state regulators, a plan it did not yet describe in detail and that Colorado said it has not seen.

  • March 25, 2024

    DOJ Slammed For Backing GEO Group In Detainee Wage Fight

    A group of immigrant detainees has urged the Ninth Circuit to reject the federal government's stance that a privately run detention center in Tacoma is exempt from Washington's minimum wage, saying the United States has failed to point to any conflicting federal laws.

  • March 25, 2024

    OSU, WSU Finalize $65M Deal With Departing Pac-12 Schools

    Oregon State University and Washington State University finalized the terms of their settlement with the departing members of the Pac-12 conference Monday, splitting $65 million in fees and securing additional protections for their slimmed-down partnership.

  • March 25, 2024

    Boeing CEO To Exit At Year's End Amid 737 Max Crisis

    The Boeing Co. announced Monday that President and CEO Dave Calhoun will exit the company at the end of the year, and the chair of its board will also step down, as the American aerospace giant overhauls its leadership ranks amid an enduring 737 Max crisis.

  • March 25, 2024

    Justices Preserve Obama-Era Forest Monument Expansion

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review two appellate court rulings upholding former President Barack Obama's expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument on the Oregon-California border.

Expert Analysis

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • 9th Circ. Gap Ruling Creates Split On Forum Selection Clause

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    The Ninth Circuit recently held in Lee v. Fisher that a forum selection clause in Gap's bylaws requiring all derivative claims to be brought in Delaware state court is enforceable, but since the Seventh Circuit struck down a similar clause in Boeing's bylaws last year, Supreme Court review may be on the horizon, say attorneys at Davis Polk.

  • The Case For Quantifying The Impact Of 'Dark Patterns'

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    Recent lawsuits alleging that Amazon and Audible used so-called dark patterns to deceive customers show that federal agencies and consumers are actively challenging such conduct, and quantifying its impact on purchase decisions is an important step toward using an evidence-based approach for determining the appropriate level of deterrence, say economists at Brattle.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Keep Up With Telemarketing Compliance: State Law Roundup

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    As more states enact mini-Telephone Consumer Protection Acts to seemingly fill the "autodialer" void left by the U.S. Supreme Court's Facebook v. Duguid ruling, compliance will become a difficult game of whack-a-mole — some of the laws regulate equipment, while others restrict to whom calls can be made, and more, say attorneys at Blank Rome.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • 9th Circ. Expands TCPA Standing, Narrowing Defenses

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    While the Ninth Circuit's recent Hall v. Smosh Dot Com decision expands Telephone Consumer Protection Act standing, companies defending TCPA claims should watch the district court's ruling on remand for a potential narrow exception where a third-party user consents to contact for a number on the do-not-call registry, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • The Supreme Court Is At War With Itself On Extraterritoriality

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued two conflicting pronouncements about the presumption against extraterritoriality without acknowledging the tensions between these decisions, which leaves lower courts, practitioners and potential defendants in the dark, says Jonah Knobler at Patterson Belknap.

  • Blunders That Made 'Bakked' Cannabis TM Go Up In Smoke

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s recent denial of National Concessions Group’s application to register the mark “BAKKED” illustrates mistakes that cannabis companies must be wary of in pursuing federal registration as examiners may look beyond the four corners of an application, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

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    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • A Midyear Look At How AI Is Affecting Lawyers

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    The past six months have been a notable period for advancements in artificial intelligence and generative AI, and as we head into the second half of the year, we must review the implications that AI has for the legal industry, including how lawyers will be advising clients on use of AI technology, says Natasha Allen at Foley & Lardner.

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