Washington

  • March 29, 2024

    Bill Would Ease Native American Travel Across Canadian Border

    A bipartisan bill recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would simplify the process for indigenous community members to cross the U.S.-Canadian border by eliminating a blood quantum requirement and allowing them to use tribal-issued identification as proof of membership in a federally recognized tribe.

  • March 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Critical Of Treasure Hunter's Insurance Appeal

    A Ninth Circuit panel expressed doubt Friday that a treasure hunter could get an insurer to pay him a $7.5 million settlement over a soured shipwreck salvaging expedition, suggesting his ex-partners' refusal to hand over vital maps was an intentional act to keep him from striking gold — not an accident covered by insurance.

  • March 29, 2024

    UK Photog Tells Judge Napster License Didn't Cover Original Art

    A British photographer told a Washington federal judge Friday that Napster's promotion of a reggae record infringed his copyright for the photo used on the album cover, arguing that even though he licensed the album art to a record company, the music streamer did not have rights to the photo itself.

  • March 29, 2024

    No Need To Revisit 'Cultural Resource' Ruling, Teck Argues

    A Teck Resources unit is urging a Washington federal judge to reject the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation's request to reconsider an order dismissing its claims for so-called tribal service losses stemming from a smelter's Columbia River pollution, saying the tribe erroneously argues limitations on natural resource damages don't apply to tribes.

  • March 29, 2024

    Attys Dodge Sanctions Over Microsoft Word Error, Judge Rules

    An error in an attorney's Microsoft Word settings made sanctions against two firms for filing oversized briefs while representing High 5 Games in a consumer protection class action unnecessary, a Washington federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • March 29, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Woes, Va. Ends Arena Plan, Pac-12 Deal

    In this week’s Off The Bench, MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani tries to untangle himself from a gambling scandal, Virginia’s rejection sends two D.C. pro franchises back home, and the Pac-12 pays up to two schools that were left behind. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 will catch you up with the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 28, 2024

    NLRB Gets 1st Backing Of Starbucks Order In Circuit Court

    A split D.C. Circuit panel on Thursday enforced a National Labor Relations Board order finding Starbucks violated federal labor law by barring a worker from passing out union pins, marking the first time a federal appeals court has weighed in on a board decision against the coffee giant.

  • March 28, 2024

    Judge Rejects Amazon's Bid To 'Backpedal' In BIPA Suit

    A Delaware federal judge will allow more plaintiffs to join a proposed class action accusing Amazon of violating Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act by collecting their voice data during calls to a financial services provider without consent, overriding the tech giant's apparent attempt to backtrack on standing concerns by instead seeking summary judgment.

  • March 28, 2024

    Delta Allowed In-Flight Sexual Assault, Passenger Alleges

    Delta Air Lines failed in March to protect a passenger from her seatmate, an off-duty airline employee who has since pled guilty to groping her while she slept, according to a Thursday complaint in Washington state court that alleges flight attendants served the assailant alcohol after he was obviously drunk.

  • March 28, 2024

    Claims Trimmed In Trader Joe's Chocolate Heavy Metals Suit

    A California judge has dismissed five out of nine claims in a consolidated complaint alleging that Trader Joe's Co. misled consumers by failing to disclose that its dark chocolate bars contain heavy metals, finding that the complaint doesn't do enough to allege that the amounts are actually dangerous.

  • March 28, 2024

    Wash. Appeals Court Asked To Mull COVID Coverage Question

    A Washington state court has halted litigation over the University of Washington's bid for COVID-19 business interruption coverage from a Liberty Mutual unit, asking a state appeals court to first determine whether the presence of COVID-19 satisfies UW's policies' direct physical loss or damage requirement and if a contamination exclusion applies.

  • March 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Let Cigna Patients Appeal Class Cert. Denial

    The Ninth Circuit won't let a group of Cigna plan participants immediately appeal a trial court's rejection of class status in their lawsuit accusing the insurance giant of unlawfully colluding with its billing contractor to underpay out-of-network claims for mental health treatments.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Claims Against Apple In Crypto Theft Row

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday partially reinstated a putative class action accusing Apple of misrepresenting the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, finding that while a federal tech immunity law shielded Apple from an array of fraud and wiretapping claims, three consumer protection claims could move forward. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Tribes Want Climate Change Row With Oil Cos. In State Court

    Two Native American tribes urged a Washington federal court to remand their consolidated case against ExxonMobil, BP, Shell, Chevron, ConocoPhillips and Phillips 66 back to state court, arguing they've only asserted state-law causes of action.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Rethink Arbitration Of Cathay Pacific Feud

    A couple left stranded in the Philippines during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic are urging the Ninth Circuit to reconsider its decision ordering them to arbitrate their breach of contract dispute with Cathay Pacific Airways under their pact with a third-party booking site.

  • March 27, 2024

    Idaho AG Won't Defend Abortion Stance, Confusing 9th Circ.

    The Idaho solicitor general insisted at a hearing before the Ninth Circuit Wednesday that the state's attorney general isn't "trying to be cute" by refusing to defend his expansive interpretation of Idaho's abortion ban in front of a baffled appellate panel.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Doubts Feds' Gambling Stance Matches Tribe's

    A Ninth Circuit judge pushed back Wednesday against a gambling company's argument that a particular Washington tribe did not need to be a part of its lawsuit over state gambling compacts, pointing out that the federal government is expected to balance competing interests — not necessarily mirror the tribes' position.

  • March 27, 2024

    On Deck In JPML: Baby Food, 23andMe Privacy, NCAA

    The Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation's packed meeting Thursday in South Carolina will see the panel mulling consolidation of privacy litigation against 23andMe, claims of heavy metals in baby food, and scholarship-fixing claims by student athletes against the NCAA — and that's just for starters.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Rejects Rust-Oleum's Bid To Sink Class Cert.

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday upheld the certification of a class of Rust-Oleum customers who are suing the company for allegedly greenwashing its degreaser products with the terms "non-toxic" and "Earth friendly."

  • March 27, 2024

    Bungie, YouTuber Settle False Copyright Infringement Suit

    An online gamer has settled a lawsuit filed by video game developer Bungie Inc. after a Washington federal judge ruled earlier this month that the gamer illegally posed as a company employee and reported Bungie fans' YouTube videos as copyright violations, according to a court order Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Meta Settles Fired Worker's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    Facebook parent company Meta has agreed to settle a Washington federal suit brought by a former project manager who claimed he was illegally fired after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19 because of his religious beliefs.

  • March 26, 2024

    Consumers Push For New 9th Circ. Panel In Qualcomm Case

    Cellphone buyers are coming out strong against Qualcomm's request to have the same Ninth Circuit panel that vacated their class certification hear an appeal to revive the long-running antitrust litigation over the company's licensing practices, saying there is no reason for "meddling with the usual practice for assigning cases."

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Frees College From Off-Campus Rape Suit

    The Ninth Circuit says a Washington university does not need to face claims by a woman who was raped at an off-campus party during her freshman year, as it was expected to do following a state supreme court ruling in the school's favor. 

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Tanker Can't Be Used To Enforce $10M Debt

    The Ninth Circuit affirmed on Monday that a nearly 800-foot crude oil tanker could not be seized to enforce some $10 million in arbitral awards against a defunct gas shipping company, ruling that the plaintiffs couldn't prove the tanker's owner had helped to hide the shipping company's assets.

  • March 26, 2024

    Subaru Can't Duck Suit Over Starlink Infotainment Defect

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday declined to throw out a proposed class action alleging the Starlink infotainment system in certain Subaru vehicles is defective, throwing out one plaintiff's state consumer protection claim, while allowing the remaining claims to go forward.

Expert Analysis

  • As Biometric Privacy Laws Grow, Cos. Must Up Transparency

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    As more states begin to introduce biometric privacy legislation, it's imperative for businesses collecting biometric data to proactively address prior notice, disclosure, collection and deletion directives, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • RICO Ruling Makes US More Attractive Foreign Creditor Forum

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Yegiazaryan v. Smagin, allowing a foreign plaintiff to use the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act to enforce a foreign arbitral award, will make judgment creditors more likely to seek out U.S. courts to remedy efforts to frustrate the enforcement of international arbitration awards, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • An Evil Bear May Provide High Court TM Ruling Clarification

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Jack Daniel's v. VIP Products leaves unanswered questions about the intersection of the First Amendment and trademark rights, which may be answered by the reconsideration of a dismissed case involving Disney and Lotso the bear from “Toy Story 3," say attorneys at Bracewell.

  • Piecing Together The Blockchain Evidentiary Hurdles

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    There are common challenges to introducing blockchain evidence at trial and a lack of uniformity in evidentiary codes at the state and federal levels means litigants must carefully navigate the uncertain blockchain puzzle, says Brett Sager at Ehrenstein Sager.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Pugin Ruling Lowers Bar For Felony-Based Deportation

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Pugin v. Garland that an offense may constitute an obstruction of justice aggravated felony, even when an investigation or proceeding is not pending, may allow the government to seek deportation for other low-level offenses never intended to be grounds for felony-based deportation, says Peter Alfredson at Capital Area Immigrants' Rights Coalition.

  • Would Biden Airline Service Order Raise 'Major Questions'?

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    President Joe Biden's recent pledge to require airlines to compensate passengers for delays and cancellations could run afoul of the U.S. Supreme Court's recently expounded "major questions" doctrine — but that will depend on what kind of action the administration takes, and how federal courts choose to apply the doctrine, says Roger Clark at Signature Resolution.

  • Wash. Health Privacy Bill May Affect Cos. Across Industries

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    Washington’s recently enacted My Health My Data Act — a comprehensive privacy framework for companies that handle consumer health — will likely apply to companies outside the state and the health care industry, and may result in more privacy litigation than we have seen under any other state privacy statute to date, says Jenny Colgate at Rothwell Figg.

  • Opinion

    States Must Fight Predatory Real Estate Listing Agreements

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    As momentum against long-term real estate listing agreements continues to grow, states should take action to render existing agreements unenforceable and discourage future unfair and deceptive trade practices in real estate, says Elizabeth Blosser at the American Land Title Association.

  • The Differing Court Approaches To Pay Equity Questions

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    Employers face the tough task of navigating an increasingly complex patchwork of pay equity laws and court interpretations, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Washington State Puts Environmental Justice At The Forefront

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    Two laws — the Healthy Environment for All Act and the Climate Commitment Act — have given Washington one of the most progressive environmental justice frameworks of any state in the country, and the resulting regulatory framework, which became fully effective on July 1, makes environmental justice assessments a key part of many projects, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Automatic Arbitration Win For Cos. May Come With Pitfalls

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent resolution of a circuit split governing arbitration stays in Coinbase v. Bielski is a win for companies seeking to enforce arbitration agreements, but there may be consequences to keep in mind when considering whether to appeal a denial of a motion to compel arbitration, say Marianne Spencer and Sonya Winner at Covington.

  • How To Avoid A Zombie Office Building Apocalypse

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    With national office vacancy rates approaching 20%, policymakers, investors and developers will need to come together in order to prevent this troubling trend from sucking the life out of business districts or contaminating the broader real estate market, say Ryan Sommers and Robyn Minter Smyers at Thompson Hine.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

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